Course Descriptions

Welcome to St. Mary’s University in Calgary, Alberta.

We welcome you to explore our course offerings, in 35 academic disciplines from Art History to Physics. While the majority of our students are working on their Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Education degrees, many take our courses intending to transfer credits to other post-secondary institutions. Others enjoy them simply for the sake of learning more about the world through the liberal arts.

If you have any questions about our courses or degree and transfer programs, please call us at (403) 531-9130.

NOTE: We may offer only a selection of these courses in any one academic year. For courses offered in the current and upcoming terms, see the Master Timetable.

These course descriptions are accurate and up-to-date as of February 2018.

A

ACCT 317 H(3-1T) INTRODUCTORY FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING
This course introduces students to the uses and interpretation of financial statements. Students will study the principles, methods and reporting of financial statements, as well as the interpretation of accounting information from the perspective of those external to the organization: shareholders, creditors, tax authorities, regulators, etc. Topics are presented from the viewpoint of the decision-maker, the end-user of the financial statements. This approach will help the student comprehend why accounting exists and what accounting can do for decision-makers. The student will learn why financial accounting methods work and the strengths and weaknesses of these methods. In addition, students will discover why there are controversies surrounding accounting methods.

ACCT 319 H(3-0) MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING
The focus of this course is on managerial accounting, used by managers for decision-making, planning and control in their organizations. The emphasis of this course is on using accounting information in managing an organization. The focus is on internal users (managers) rather than external users such as investors.
Prerequisite: ACCT 317

ART 201 H(3-0) SURVEY OF WESTERN ART FROM PREHISTORY TO THE LATE GOTHIC
A chronological examination of art and architecture (with some reference to the other arts) in relation to significant historical and cultural events from Prehistory to about 1300 AD.

ART 203 H(3-0) SURVEY OF WESTERN ART FROM PROTO-RENAISSANCE TO NEOCLASSICISM
A chronological examination of art and architecture in relation to significant historical and cultural events from about 1300 AD to about 1800 AD.

ART 325 H(3-0) ITALIAN RENAISSANCE ART AND ARCHITECTURE
A chronological examination of the arts and architecture from circa 1280 to 1563. Specific attention will be given to the artistic centres of Florence, Venice and Rome.
Prerequisite: ART 201 or 203

ART 355 H(3-0) BAROQUE AND ROCOCO ART AND ARCHITECTURE
A chronological examination of art and architecture from circa 1563 to 1789. The course will concentrate on art and architecture of Italy, France, Flanders, Holland and England during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.
Prerequisite: ART 203

ART 405 H(3-0) ART AND ARCHITECTURE OF ROME
This course has special costs and requires travel. ART 405 examines the metamorphoses and continuities that characterize Roman artistic culture and its urban and architectural settings during the 1,300 year period between the end of pagan Roman Antiquity and the Baroque era. Class meetings take place on location in the city, permitting first-hand study of extant works in situ. These range chronologically from the Ancient, Early Christian, medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque Rome. The course will have an interdisciplinary theme focusing on the interplay of cultural, political, and social forces shaping the art and architecture of each era which in turn transformed the very visage of Rome itself.
Prerequisite: ART 203 or equivalent, or permission of the instructor

ASTR 205 H(3-0) MODERN ASTRONOMY
A comprehensive, descriptive survey of modern astronomy that focuses on the development of our present views of the universe. Topics include the solar system, the birth and death of stars, the Milky Way and other galaxies, cosmic rays, pulsars and supernovae, the concept of a black hole, exploding galaxies and quasars, the beginning and end of the universe, the possibilities of extraterrestrial life and interstellar communication.
Note: This course is not recommended for natural science majors.

B

BCEM 393 H(3-3L) INTRODUCTION TO BIOCHEMISTRY
This course provides a study of the structure and function of carbohydrates, amino acids, proteins and enzymes. Emphasis will be placed on protein sequence, three-dimensional structure of proteins and enzyme catalysis. Basic metabolic pathways will also be studied, including glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation.
Prerequisites: CHEM 351
Suggested corequisite: CHEM 353

BIOL 205 H(3-0) THE ORGANIZATION AND DIVERSITY OF LIFE
A study of biological concepts and mechanisms illustrated by current examples of medical and environmental problems.
Note: Not open for credit to those intending to major or minor in biological sciences.

BIOL 231 H(3-3L) INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY I
An examination of many fundamental principles of life common to all organisms; the course continues with an overview of structure, replication and function in viruses, bacteria and protists.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 30 (Minimum grade of 65 per cent) and Biology 30 (Minimum grade of 65 per cent)
Note: Not recommended for those students seeking a single, half-course, general interest overview of the biological sciences.

BIOL 233 H(3-3L) INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY II
A continuation of BIOL 231, this course centres on organismic biology of fungi, plants and animals. Various groups are introduced with a focus on diversity, form and function in plants and major animal phyla. Includes an introduction to major concepts in ecology and in evolution by natural selection.
Prerequisite: BIOL 231

BIOL 305 H(3-0) THE HUMAN ORGANISM
An introduction to the construction (anatomy) and operation (physiology) of the human body. This course provides an organ system review, allowing for an understanding of foundations of human health and the diseased state.
Prerequisites: Biology 30, BIOL 205, BIOL 231 or second-year standing
Note: Not open for credit to those intending to major or minor in biological sciences.

BIOL 307 H(3-0) ECOLOGY AND HUMAN AFFAIRS
The major principles of ecology and evolution, how organisms survive in the physical environment, Darwinism, sex and societies, species interactions, who lives where and why, who lives together and how, and the biology of ecosystems. The intent of the course is to give non-biologists an understanding of ecological and evolutionary principles that will allow them to better appreciate the place and role of human beings in the modern world.
Prerequisite: Second-year standing
Antirequisites: BIOL 313
Note: Not open for credit to those intending to major or minor in biological sciences.

BIOL 311 H(3-3L) PRINCIPLES OF GENETICS
Topics will include Mendelian inheritance, allelic relationships, genetic linkage, sex linkage, sex determination, changes in chromosome structure, segregation and recombination, structure and function of genetic material, molecular genetics, genetics of bacteria and viruses and gene fine structure, function and regulation. Selected organisms and computer models will be used in the laboratories to illustrate pertinent genetic principles.
Prerequisites: BIOL 331

BIOL 313 H(3-3L) AN INTRODUCTION TO ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION
Ecological processes and evolutionary principles that explain the origin, maintenance and dynamics of biological diversity. Ecological interactions will be studied to understand the dynamics of populations and communities, and the evolution of traits. Mechanisms of genetic change of populations and how these changes give rise to large-scale evolutionary patterns will be discussed.
Prerequisite: BIOL 233
Antirequisite: BIOL 307

BIOL 315 H(3-3L) Biostatistics
This course begins with a discussion of descriptive statistics, experimental design and data collection. Also includes probability and probability distributions, hypothesis testing, regression, correlation, goodness of fit tests and analysis of variance. These statistical methods will be applied to problems in biology.
Prerequisites: BIOL 233 and one of MATH 211, MATH 249, MATH 251 or MATH
253
Antirequisites: STAT 213 and STAT 217

BIOL 317 H(3-3L) Introduction to Marine Biology
This field course (including lectures, laboratories, field collection, identification and observation) will introduce students to the diversity of organisms found in the west coast rainforest, ocean, coastal and inter-tidal zones. Students will also investigate species’ adaptations to their environment and the factors that control their productivity, distribution and abundance. The emphasis will be on the ecological and physiological study of living organisms in the laboratory and the field, including examination of plankton and sub-tidal and benthic environments by dredging.
Prerequisites: BIOL 231 and BIOL 233 and permission of the instructor.

BIOL 331 H(3-1T) INTRODUCTION TO CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY
The principles of cellular structure and function. Molecular organization of membranes, organelles, and nucleus and cytoplasmic structures; the integration of cellular functions; assembly of organelles; the regulation of cell proliferation and the interaction of cells with their neighbours and their environment.
Prerequisite: BIOL 231 and CHEM 203

BIOL 341 H(3-3L) Introduction to Microbiology
An introductory study of prokaryotes, protists, fungi and viruses. Systematics, ecology, physiology, molecular biology and roles in industry, pathogenesis and the environment will be emphasized.
Prerequisites: BIOL 231 and CHEM 203

BIOL 375 H(3-3L) Invertebrate Zoology
A survey of the invertebrate phyla with particular reference to this which exemplify the following grades or organization: proplasmic, cellular, tissue, and organ-system and within the latter-acoelomate, pseudocoelomate, schizocoelomate. Empphasis is placed on functional morphology of the major phyla and indentification of common repreentatives in Alberta.
Prerequisite: BIOL: 313

BIOL 377 H(3-3L) Vertebrate Zoology
A survey of the major vertebrate classes including comparative anatomy, physiology, ontogeny, natural history and systematics. The laboratory will concentrate on the morphology and identification of native species.
Prerequisites: BIOL 311 and BIOL 313

BIOL 381 H(3-3L) Mycology
A survey of the major fungal phyla including morphology, physiology and natural history. The roles of fungi in the ecosystem, industry and pathology will be discussed. The laboratory will focus on the morphology and identification of local species as well as ecosystem and industrial functions.
Prerequisites: BIOL 233, BIOL 311 and BIOL 313

BIOL 411 H(3-3L) Genetics
Gene expression and regulation of development in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Topics include: bioinfom1atics, genomics, genome structure, DNA topology, chromatin structure, DNA mutation and repair, recombination, post-transcriptional RNA processing. Examination of microbial genetics will include study of horizontal gene transfer and diverse mechanisms of replication. Laboratory experiences will cover molecular genetics techniques and the biochemistry of nucleic acids.
Prerequisites: BIOL 311

BIOL 413 H(3-3L) Ecology
Ecological interactions in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems with an emphasis on integration of processes across population, community and ecosystem levels. Temporal and spatial dimensions of mutualism, competition, predation, parasitism, diversity, nutrient and energy fluxes, will be discussed. Field studies in Fish Creek Provincial Park will be an important component of this course.
Prerequisites: BIOL 313 and BIOL 315

BIOL 415 H(3-0) Evolution
A study of evolutionary processes and the origins of organismal diversity. Topics include genetic variation, genetic drift, natural and sexual selection, co-evolution, speciation, phylogeny, biogeography, and the history of evolutionary thought.
Prerequisites: BIOL 311 and BIOL 313

BIOL 417 h(3-3L) Tropical Ecology and Biodiversity
An examination of biodiversity in a selected region of the tropics, including aspects of ecology of animals and plants, animal behaviour and an introduction to field techniques for observing and censusing selected taxa. Field studies will take place at forest, savannah and marine sites with consideration of community-based conservation efforts. This course has special costs and requires international travel. The field studies portion of the course will be done over Reading Week.
Prerequisites: BIOL 313, BIOL 315 and permission of the instructor

BIOL 431 H(3-0) Cellular & Molecular Biology
Detailed investigation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell and molecular biology, including the endomembrane system, protein modification, subcellular organization and dynamics, the cytoskeleton, and motility.
Prerequisites: BIOL 331

BIOL 433 H(3-0) Immunology
Comprehensive overview of immunity including vaccination, MHC antigens, lymphocyte cell-surface receptors, antibody production and class switching, complement, genetics of immune response diversity, tolerance and anti-tumour responses. The course will also address mechanisms to evade immune surveillance and disorders of the immune system including autoimmunity and hypersensitivity.
Prerequisites: BIOL 311 and BIOL 331

BIOL 441 H(3-0) Microbiology
A further study of environmental, pathogenic and industrial prokaryotes, protists, fungi and viruses. Topics will include diversity, extremophiles, ecosystem cycling, virulence factors, antibiotic resistance, biofilms, bioremediation, and engineering of custom microbes for biotechnology applications. Diversity of metabolic pathways and adaptations to changing environments by free-living or in-host microbes will be emphasized.
Prerequisites: BIOL 331 and BIOL 341

BIOL 451 H(3-0) BIOLOGICAL CONSERVATION 

The application of ecological theory and principles to the conservation and management of natural and modified ecosystems, with emphasis on preservation of biodiversity and sustainable development. Topics include disturbance as an ecological process, ecological and evolutionary responsiveness of natural systems, ecology of resource harvesting, management of endangered habitats and populations, implications of human population growth, and global change.
Prerequisite: BIOL 307 or BIOL 313

BIOL 491 H(3-0)Senior Project I
Each student will develop a project proposal in collaboration with faculty and with constructive review by peers. Possible projects range from traditional lab- or field-based research to community development or environmental stewardship initiatives. Students wishing to conduct more traditional research may take advantage of our proximity to Fish Creek Provincial Park or work in one of our labs. Students preferring community or environmental projects may use multi-disciplinary approaches and/or collaboration with other individuals and organizations. Prerequisites: BIOL 311, BIOL 313, BIOL 331 and permission of the instructor

BIOL 493 H(0-6L) Senior Project II
This course is the second half of St. Mary’s University capstone sequence for the 4-year BSc in Biology which builds on the preparation provided by BIOL 491 and prior courses. Students will demonstrate their mastery of critical writing and oral defence. Students conducting research will develop a detailed experimental protocol, test their methods in preliminary experiments and conduct the research. Students conducting non-research projects will develop a detailed protocol and conduct the project. All students will present their results in a professional manner and defend their conclusions in a forum open to all members of the St. Mary’s University community. Possible projects range from traditional lab- or field-based research to community development or environmental stewardship initiatives. Students wishing to conduct more traditional research may take advantage of our proximity to Fish Creek Provincial Park or work in one of our labs. Students preferring community or environmental projects may use multi-disciplinary approaches and/or collaboration with other individuals and organizations.
Prerequisite: BIOL 491 and permission of the instructor
Note: This is a multi-term course with 0 credits in spring/summer and fall and 3 credits in winter.

C

CHEM 201 H(3-1T-3L) GENERAL CHEMISTRY I
An introduction to university chemistry from a theoretical and practical perspective, exploring the relationship between chemical structure and reactivity. Topics include using examples from inorganic and organic chemistry to investigate chemical bonding, intermolecular interactions and kinetics.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 30 and Pure Mathematics 30 or MATH 30-1 with a minimum grade of 65 per cent, or MATH 105; Mathematics 31 strongly recommended

CHEM 203 H(3-1T-3L) GENERAL CHEMISTRY II
A continued analysis of the relationship between chemical structure and reactivity. Topics include using examples from inorganic and organic chemistry to investigate energetics, equilibria (e.g. acidity and basicity, quantitative and qualitative) and redox reactions.
Prerequisite: CHEM 201
Suggested pre – or co- requisite: MATH 211, MATH 249, MATH 251 or MATH 253

CHEM 351 H(3-1T-3L) ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I
An introduction to organic chemistry from a mechanistic perspective. The physical and structural concepts of organic chemistry will be discussed in relation to the reactions of alkanes, cycloalkanes, haloalkanes, alkenes, and alkynes. Substitution and elimination reactions will be discussed in detail with a strong emphasis on the mechanism of these reactions, as well as on the stereochemistry, kinetics, and thermodynamics of these reactions. Spectroscopy, including UV-Vis, IR, and 1H and 13C NMR, will be taught with an emphasis on structure determination. Lectures will frequently include examples of biologically significant molecules to illustrate various concepts from class. The laboratory will introduce students to basic preparation and purification techniques employed by organic chemists.
Prerequisite: CHEM 201 and 203

CHEM 353 H(3-1T-3L) ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II
A continuation of CHEM 351. The reactions of organic molecules will be examined in detail from a mechanistic perspective, including those of benzene and its derivatives, alcohols, thiols, ethers, epoxides, carbonyl compounds and carboxylic acids and their derivatives. The spectroscopic properties of each functional group will be examined in further detail and will be discussed in relation to their utility in the analysis of organic reactions and syntheses. Lectures will frequently include examples of biologically significant molecules to illustrate various concepts from class, with an emphasis on the synthesis of pharmaceuticals. Laboratory exercises focus on synthesis, the chemistry of some naturally occurring compounds such as carbohydrates and lipids, and the application of chemical and spectroscopic investigations in the elucidation of structure. Laboratory skills developed in CHEM 351 will be reinforced and extended.
Prerequisite: CHEM 351

CLAS 209 H(3-0) CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY
This course surveys the foundation stories in our literary tradition. In addition to the myths themselves, this course considers the epic and dramatic sources of the myths of the Greeks and the Romans. The impact of these tales on ancient cultures, as well as our own, provides us with an enriched understanding of ourselves.

CLAS 315 H(3-0) CLASSICAL STUDIES: GREEK AND ROMAN HISTORY
This course looks at the ancient cultures of Greece and Rome, focusing on cultural, political, literary and economic issues. We begin with Bronze Age Greece and continue through the dissolution of the Roman Empire. Note: Credit for both CLAS 315 and HIST 307 will not be
allowed.

CLAS 321 H(3-0) CLASSICAL LITERATURE: THE EPIC AND THE LYRIC
A study of The Iliad, The Odyssey and selected lyric poetry from ancient Greece. Students will be expected to read both epics as well as the poetry assigned. The emphasis in this course includes the historical and cultural backgrounds of Mycenaean Greece as reflected in the epics.
Antirequisites: CLAS 221

CLAS 323 H(3-0) CLASSICAL LITERATURE: DRAMA
This course studies selected Greek plays, with special concern for the origin of drama, the cultural background of Classical Greece and the effect of Greek theatre on contemporary drama.
Antirequisites: CLAS 221

CPSC 205 H(3-3L) INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS
A survey of personal computer system fundamentals including hardware, applications software and computer communications both on campus and using the Internet. Students will use personal computers to complete assignments in word processing, spreadsheet analysis, database management and other applications.
Note: Does not fulfill Natural and Mathematical Sciences requirement.

CPSC 215 H(3-3L) INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING
Introduction to problem solving, algorithm design and implementation using a structured programming language such as Python. Discussion of, and practice with, elementary programming techniques with emphasis on good style.

D

DRAM 201 H(3-3L) INTRODUCTION TO ACTING
This course offers students an introduction to the technique of acting. The focus is on acting, voice, movement and dramaturgical skills. These skills are taught through improvisation and scene study.

DRAM 203 H(3-3L) INTRODUCTION TO THEATRICAL PERFORMANCE
In a practical manner and in the context of theatrical production, students apply the more general foundation and practical skills outlined in DRAM 201 while participating in a production. The focus is on all components of performance including acting, movement, voice, dramaturgy, preparation, and rehearsal and performance skills.
Prerequisite: Audition
Note: Students may obtain credit for both DRAM 203 and DRAM 205 only if they are taken in different academic years.

DRAM 205 H(3-3L) INTRODUCTION TO THEATRICAL PRODUCTION
This course is designed for those students who wish to become involved in a theatrical production as a technician. Production skills will be taught through the Winter term production at St. Mary’s University. Admission to the course is by interview only. Students will take on technical roles after a placement interview with the instructor. The University will set an interview date approximately one month before the course begins. The focus of the course is on all components of production, including costume, lighting, make-up, properties, set, sound, stage management, house management and publicity. Includes six hours of practical application per week.
Prerequisite: Placement interview and DRAM 201 or permission of instructor
Note: Students may obtain credit for both DRAM 203 and DRAM 205 only if they are taken in different academic years.

DRAM 301 H(3-3L) ADVANCED ACTING
An advanced study of the techniques of acting focusing on theoretical and practical modes of performance. Advanced Acting continues to build on the knowledge, skills and practices introduced in DRAM 201 and DRAM 203. Through an in-depth study of the theory and application of the actor’s craft, students will develop research and performance projects focusing on classical and contemporary theatre including both monologue and ensemble work. Research and writing skills relevant to the discipline are incorporated throughout the course.
Prerequisites: DRAM 201, DRAM 203, and an audition or permission of the instructor.

DRAM 303 H(3-3L) ADVANCED THEATRICAL PERFORMANCE
An advanced study of the elements of theatrical performance, using both theoretical and practical modes of analysis. Advanced Theatrical Performance continues to develop the knowledge, skills and practices introduced in DRAM 301, with an emphasis on implementation and critical analysis of performance results.
Prerequisites: DRAM 301 and an audition.

DRAM 305 H(3-3L) ADVANCED THEATRICAL PRODUCTION
This course develops skills used in DRAM 205. Production skills will be planned and executed in connection with the Winter term production at St. Mary’s University. Admission to the course is by interview only. Students will take on technical roles after a placement interview with the instructor. The University will set an interview date approximately one month before the course begins. The focus of the course is on all components of production, including costume, lighting, make-up, properties, set, sound, stage management, house management and publicity. Includes six hours of practical application per week. Enrolment in this course is contingent on the availability of mentors.
Prerequisites: DRAM 205 and interview

DRAM 401 H(3-3L) ADVANCED ACTING II
An advanced study of the techniques of acting, focusing on theoretical and practical modes of performance. Advanced Acting II builds on the knowledge, skills and practices studied and practiced in DRAM 301 and DRAM 303. Through an in-depth study of the theory and application of the actor’s craft, students will develop research and performance projects focusing on classical and contemporary theatre, including both monologue and ensemble work. Research and writing skills relevant to the discipline are incorporated throughout the course.
Prerequisites: DRAM 301 and DRAM 303 or permission of the instructor

DRAM 403 H(3-3L) ADVANCED THEATRICAL PERFORMANCE II
An advanced study of the elements of theatrical performance using both theoretical and practical modes of analysis. This course continues to develop the knowledge, skills and practices from DRAM 401, with an emphasis on implementation and critical analysis of performance results. Students in DRAM 403 will be expected to assume a leadership/mentoring role with their fellow actors.
Prerequisites: DRAM 401 and audition

DRAM 405 H(3-3L) SPECIAL PROJECTS
A special project that offers a unique opportunity to experience drama through a site-specific production, travel study or collaboration. Topics will vary. Course may be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

E

ECON 201 H(3-1T) PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS
This course features the principles of consumption, production, exchange, and market and firm equilibrium under different competitive conditions. These principles are applied to various contemporary problems in the Canadian economy, such as the changing structure of agriculture, government policies and pollution.
Note: Tutorial is independent computer-based work

ECON 203 H(3-1T) PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS
National income determination, the monetary and banking system, and elementary fiscal and monetary policies constitute the key components of this course. Contemporary problems of unemployment, inflation, economic growth, business cycles and the international economy are discussed.
Note: Tutorial is independent computer-based work

ECON 205 H(3-0) ECONOMIC ISSUES
This course considers various contemporary social issues, concentrating on the perspective economics brings to these issues. Topics are selected by the instructor.
Note: Not open for credit to those intending to major or minor in economics

ECON 301 H(3-0) Intermediate Microeconomics
This course provides grounding in neoclassical and other modern theories concerning consumer behaviour, production and market structure, and social issues concerning markets and government.
Prerequisite: ECON 201

ECON 303 H(3-0) INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS
This course explores the behaviour of the economy as a whole: booms and recessions, national production and productivity, rates of inflation and unemployment, the international balance of payments and exchange rates. This course examines modern macroeconomic theory and its application to current Canadian issues.
Prerequisite: ECON 203

ECON 337 H(3-0) ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
This is a multidisciplinary course examining the experiences of developing countries. The course covers the diverse experiences of newly industrializing countries, with enrichment through case studies (e.g., Nicaragua, Haiti, Nigeria, India, China and Egypt). Topics include historical experience, including the impact of colonialism in some countries; cultural values and the stress of development on traditional cultures; economic resources and choices; varying political experiences and their effect on development; development experience as reflected in the arts and other culture; critical economic issues including income distribution, population control, urban versus rural priorities, education and the environment; and the role of development assistance, both bilaterally and multilaterally.
Prerequisite: ECON 201 or ECON 203

ECON 373 H(3-0) RESOURCE ECONOMICS AND SOCIAL COST BENEFIT ANALYSIS
This course provides background theory on assessing the impacts on the economy as a whole of decisions by private firms and consumers. It provides students with the tools for evaluating benefits and costs of both market and non-market impacts, for example, the impact of pollution on loss of agricultural productivity, aggravation of medical problems, alteration of eco-habitats, etc.
Prerequisite: ECON 201 or ECON 203

Bachelor of Education (Elementary)

EDCM 301 H(3-0) Introduction to Curricular Design
This course is dedicated to lesson planning and delivery. Students will be expected to plan, implement, and revise lessons. Key instructional and theoretical models for the elementary classroom will be explored to provide students with a beginning repertoire of basic pedagogical strategies, frameworks of teacher-student relationships, and to initiate an understanding of the learning process.

EDCM 302 H(3-0) Curriculum and Instruction in Literacy Education
This course focuses on methodology as applied to the teaching of literacy education. It will examine the intersections between literacy, education and culture. Dimensions of language development, literacy learning, and diversity are explored in classroom practices.

EDCM 303 H(3-0) Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary Mathematics Education
This course focuses on methodology as applied to the teaching of mathematics in elementary education. Students will become familiar with the Alberta Mathematics Program of Study K – 6. Topics will include the development of mathematical knowledge (numeracy); diagnostic and remediation strategies in teaching mathematics; and the development of teaching competencies in mathematics education as they relate to curriculum requirements.

EDFN 311 H(3-0) Student Engagement
This course is dedicated to effective classroom management practices informed by principles of educational psychology, sociology, and brain-based research.

EDFN 313 H(3-0) Teaching for Diversity and the Common Good
This course focuses on the teaching profession as a vehicle for the promotion of the common good in a diverse and democratic society. It will explore the nexus between individual professional perspectives and societal expectations for educators. The course attends to how theory and practice interact to foster the realization of an expansive vision of professional practice.

EDPH 321 H(3-0) Philosophy of Catholic Education
Theological and philosophical principles of the Catholic intellectual tradition; primary understandings of philosophy. Principles of inclusive education and sensitivity to the relationship between culture and spirituality.

EDPH 327 H(3-0) Historical and Philosophical Bases of Faith-based Education
A review of the primary philosophies of education and their historical roots; consideration of various philosophical schools including idealism, realism and pragmatism; historical origins and development of the concept of ideology; the role of historical reflection in education

EDPH 329 H(3-0) Spirituality of the Catholic Educator
This course is a study of Catholic Spirituality and Catholic Social Teaching in education, Students will become familiar with basic concepts such as human dignity, the common good, solidarity and the option for the poor. They will examine, in particular, teaching as a vocation; spirituality of an educator; building culture and climate in the school; social justice principles.

EDPR 331 H(3-3 weeks P) Practicum I: Observation
EDPR 331 will be three weeks in an assigned Division I or Division II classroom setting. The primary objectives include observations, one-on-one and small group work.

EDPR 337 H(3-5 Week P) Practicum II: Orientation
EDPR 337 will be five weeks in an assigned Division 1 or Division II classroom setting. The primary objectives include one-on-one and small group work leading to the creation and delivery of lesson(s).

EDPR 339 Q(1.5-3 Weeks P) Specialization Practicum
This course offers student-teachers a practicum experience in a particular domain of teaching specialization that may not be offered as part of the 331, 337, 431 or 437 practicum placements. Practicum assignments will be determined with the Dean of Education and school officials.
The student-teacher functions in an internship role under the direct supervision of assigned core faculty and associate supervisors, working in cooperation to develop specific criteria for both student-teacher and teacher associate. Student-teacher assignments are developed in cooperation with school officials assigned by the cooperating school district/division. Pass/Fail grading.

EDCM 404 H(3-0) Curriculum & Instruction in Social Studies Education
This course focuses on methodology as applied to the teaching of social studies in elementary education. Students will become familiar with the Alberta Social Studies Program of Study K-6. Students will explore and use the disciplinary skills needed to implement powerful social studies pedagogy, which foster students’ moral and intellectual capacities. These include analyzing and interpreting both past and present; discussing and seeking solutions to challenging problems and controversial issues; and engaging actively with the challenging content in meaningful ways.

EDCM 405 H(3-0) Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary Science Education
This course focuses on methodology as applied to the teaching of science in elementary education. Students will become familiar with the Alberta Science Program of Studies K to 6 as well as related curriculum documents published by Alberta Education. Particular emphasis will be given to the inquiry method of teaching science, planning and assessing for science, process skills, conducting fair tests and planning with the end in mind. There will also be a review of learning theories as they apply to science education, an examination of Canadian Science curricula with specific regard to competencies and reflective practice as well as a focus on organizing the science classroom.

EDCM 407 H(3-0) Religious Education in the Elementary Schools
This course is devoted to an examination of some of the key contemporary documents essential to understanding religious education principles as identifies in the core curriculum. The focus will be on educationally relevant material post-Vatican II. Students will have the option in the latter part of the course to study the Catholic or Public school program of studies with an emphasis on the development of moral responsibility.

EDCM 409 H(3-0) Assessment and Evaluation of Student Learning
This course focuses on the complexity of classroom assessment as a means of supporting and measuring student learning. It is designed to facilitate growth as an assessor, evaluator and communicator of student learning. Specifically, the course will emphasize gathering relevant student learning data to inform both teaching and learning (formative assessments), and gathering student learning data to evaluate and report achievement of student learning (summative assessment).

EDCM 411 H(3-0) The Education Profession in the Province of Alberta
An examination of the broad education framework as determine in the governing policy and legislation in the province of Alberta. The responsibilities of certified teachers will be explored as they relate to the legislated moral and ethical frameworks within which the teacher works.

EDFN 417 H(3-0) Inclusive Education: Meeting the Needs of All Learners
This course focuses on inclusive education with a particular emphasis on atypical child development. Topics include special needs and syndromes that impact student learning; planning for individual students using modified and adapted curriculum, Alberta Education philosophy and coding system for special needs programming; developing resiliency and wellness in teachers, students, classrooms and schools.

EDPR 431 H(6-0) Practicum III Intermediate
This course consists of eight weeks in an assigned Division I or Division II classroom setting. The primary objectives include preparation and delivery of individual lesson plans, progressing to a series of lesson plans and leading to the development of a unit plan.

EDPR 437 H(6-0) Practicum IV: Advanced
This course consists of ten weeks in an assigned Division I or Division II classroom setting. The primary objectives include the continued preparation and delivery of lesson plans, progressing to more extensive unit planning and increased classroom responsibility.

EDPR 441 H(3-0) International Specialized Practicum
This course is a specialized practicum in an assigned international classroom setting for the purpose of developing increased awareness and understanding of teaching and learning in an international setting. Students will experience the practical, personal, and ethical challenges of living and teaching in a foreign culture. Pass/Fail grading

EDPA 557 H(3-0) Theory and Practice of Catholic School Administration
An examination of the theory and practice of administration
in Catholic school leadership within the province of Alberta.
Students will develop an understanding of the Catholic
leadership role as well as the linkages with stakeholders such as
parents, teachers, church community leaders, and organizations.
Students will also gain an appreciation for best practices for
leading current educational change implementation.
Note: Restricted to students enrolled in one of the Catholic
Educators’ Programs.

EDPA 591 H(3-0) PHILOSOPHY OF CATHOLIC EDUCATION
A study of some major educational and theological topics and their implications for a philosophy of Catholic schools, and the articulation of what a Catholic school should be in a pluralistic society. Emphasis will be on how to integrate a Catholic vision into all aspects of school life.
Note: Restricted to students enrolled in one of the Religious Educator Programs for Catholic Teachers and Administrators.

EDPA 593 H(3-0) PHILOSOPHICAL BASIS OF MORAL EDUCATION
A study of the educational implications of the following concepts: faith and moral values, the distinctiveness of a Christian morality and moral development. The course will include a critical appraisal of current moral development theories from a Christian viewpoint. Special emphasis will be placed on conscience and decision making. Some areas of current Christian moral concern will be explored.
Note: Restricted to students enrolled in one of the Religious Educator Programs for Catholic Teachers and Administrators.

EDPA 595 H(3-0) METHODS IN RELIGIOUS EDUCATION
A study and critique of the issues and trends in relationship to traditional and contemporary religious education theories and methods. Teaching strategies are discussed and demonstrated.
Note: Restricted to students enrolled in one of the Religious Educator Programs for Catholic Teachers and Administrators.

EDPD 511 Q(3-0) FAITH DEVELOPMENT AND RELIGIOUS EDUCATION
An investigation of the meaning of faith and religion within the context of educational development. Application of the results to the creation of the objectives for religious education development in schools.
Note: Restricted to students enrolled in one of the Religious Educator Programs for Catholic Teachers and Administrators.

EDPD 513 Q(3-0) RELIGIOUS EDUCATION: ETHICAL, MORAL AND SOCIAL JUSTICE ISSUES
An historical and analytical study of selected social issues in the ethical sub-context. The opening inquiry will examine the social teaching of the Church in its historical development. The following analysis will focus on two key and timely areas of the family and profession, ethics at home and in the office.
Note: Restricted to students enrolled in one of the Religious Educator Programs for Catholic Teachers and Administrators.

EDPD 531 Q(3-0) THE SCHOOL AS CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY
Exploration of the meaning of Christian community in the context of teaching, and methods for developing a school as Christian community where friendship, sharing and celebration of life and learning are an everyday experience for children and adults.
Note: Restricted to students enrolled in one of the Religious Educator Programs for Catholic Teachers and Administrators.

EDPD 533 Q(3-0) SPIRITUALITY AND LEADERSHIP
This course will focus on the spiritual dimensions of leadership; the leader’s personal spiritual growth; the leader’s responsibilities in the areas of faith development; celebrations of faith; Christian service; and the moral development of children, youth and adults in a Catholic school community.
Note: Restricted to students enrolled in one of the Religious Educator Programs for Catholic Teachers and Administrators.

EDPD 535 Q(3-0) INTRODUCTION TO THE THEOLOGY OF THE CHURCH
This course will begin by establishing a common understanding that the Church exists as a servant to its members and to the world. Discussion will focus on a variety of topics, including an overview of Church history that highlights significant developments; an examination of current models of the Church; and special questions such as authority, the papacy, ministry, the role of women and ecumenism. The class will examine the implication of the subject matter for leaders in Catholic schools.
Note: Restricted to students enrolled in one of the Religious Educator Programs for Catholic Teachers and Administrators.

EDPD 555 Q(3-0) CURRENT ISSUES IN CATHOLIC EDUCATION
The content of this professional development course varies from year to year. The program of classes takes the form of four evening sessions that involve personal reflection in advance, lectures, discussion among participants and interaction with the lecturers. Each evening session focuses on a theme relevant to the classroom in fields such as biblical studies, theology, spirituality, interfaith dialogue, ecumenical dialogue, ethics, Church history, teaching of the Magisterium, inculturation of the Gospel, catechesis and human development, and pedagogy.
Note: Restricted to students enrolled in one of the Religious Educator Programs for Catholic Teachers and Administrators.

EDPD 571 Q(3-0) BASIC INTRODUCTION TO SCRIPTURE
An introduction to the genesis, development and arrangement of the Bible. The course will provide an overview of the history of ancient Israel, the emergence of early Judaism and the origins of Christianity within the Mediterranean world of the first century AD. Against this historical and cultural background, discussion will focus on primary themes such as creation, redemption, covenant, Jesus of Nazareth, and portraits of Jesus in the gospels and Pauline literature.
Note: Restricted to students enrolled in one of the Catholic Educator Programs

ENGL 200A H (3-1T) LITERATURE IN ENGLISH FROM THE MIDDLE AGES TO 1660
An historical survey of poetry, prose, and drama written in English from the Middle Ages to 1660. As the first half of the ENGL 200A/B sequence, which forms a required foundation for senior-level studies in English, this course introduces representative writers and genres from the Medieval period to the Restoration, and trains students in critical writing and research. Readings are discussed in relation to their religious, philosophical, and political backgrounds, as well as to relevant literary traditions.
Antirequisite: ENGL 200

ENGL 200B H (3-1T) LITERATURE IN ENGLISH FROM 1660 TO THE PRESENT
An historical survey of poetry, prose, and drama written in English from 1660 to the present. As the second half of the ENGL 201/203 sequence, which forms a required foundation for senior-level studies in English, this course introduces representative writers and genres from the Restoration period to the present, and trains students in critical writing and research. Readings are discussed in relation to their religious, philosophical, and political backgrounds, as well as to relevant literary traditions.
Pre-requisite: ENGL 200A
Antirequisite: ENGL 200

ENGL 211 H(3-0) INTRODUCTION TO PROSE FICTION
A study of forms of prose as they have developed since 1750. The emphasis is on forms of fiction (the novel and the short story) although other prose genres may be added to the reading list at the instructor’s discretion. Students receive instruction in the writing of academic essays and are introduced to research methodology.
Note: This course may not be used to satisfy English requirements in St. Mary’s University degree programs.

ENGL 303 H(3-0) EARLY MEDIEVAL LITERATURE
A study of medieval literature from the sixth to the twelfth century. A substantial portion of the course will be devoted to reading Old English texts in their original language. The principal focus will be on Old and Middle English texts, but the course may also examine other medieval texts in translation. Texts will include representative works from a variety of genres including epic, early romance, heroic poetry, elegy, dream vision, and chronicle.
Prerequisite: ENGL 200 or ENGL 200A and ENGL 200B

ENGL 305 H(3-0) Challenging Authority: Issues in Later Medieval Literature
An examination of medieval literature from the thirteenth to the fifteenth century. Although the principal focus will be on Middle English texts in their original language, the course may also examine other medieval texts in translation. The instructor may choose a different topic from year to year (e.g. medieval sexuality or literature of the Peasants’ Revolt). The readings may include such texts as: Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Piers Plowman, The Book of Margery Kempe.
Prerequisites: ENGL 200 or ENGL 200A and ENGL 200B

ENGL 309 H(3-0) Courtiers and Kings: Issues in Renaissance Literature
An examination of Renaissance literature (circa 1485 to 1660). Although the course may consider some works of Shakespeare, they will not be a major focus. The instructor may choose a different topic from year to year (e.g. literary coterie culture or literature of travel and other worlds). Readings may include the works of writers such as Wyatt, Spenser, Jonson, and Milton.
Prerequisites: ENGL 200 or ENGL 200A and ENGL 200B

ENGL 313 H(3-0) SHAKESPEARE: THE EARLY WORKS
A study of Shakespeare’s plays and poetry from the period prior to the death of Elizabeth I in 1603. Emphasis will be on the comedies, histories and sonnets. Class discussion will be augmented by dramatic readings, viewing of films and attendance at live theatre when possible.
Prerequisite: ENGL 200 or ENGL 200A and ENGL 200B

ENGL 315 H(3-0) SHAKESPEARE: THE LATER WORKS
A study of Shakespeare’s plays from the later period. Close reading of the great tragedies and later romances will be augmented by dramatic readings, viewing of films and attendance at live theatre when possible.
Prerequisite: ENGL 200 or ENGL 200A and ENGL 200B

ENGL 317 H(3-0) Love, Hate, and Satire: Restoration and 18th Century Literature
A study of the intersections of genre, economic change, political power, and scientific and sexual attitudes during Britain’s long eighteenth century (1660-1790). We will use social history—our understanding of commerce, domesticity, race relations, and gender systems—to examine public and private literatures, from magazine culture, comedy of manners, and the modern novel to satirical poetry and intimate letters.
Prerequisite: ENGL 200 or ENGL 200A and ENGL 200B

ENGL 321 H(3-0) POETRY AND POETICS
A close study of selected poetry written in English, with a focus on Canadian, British and American authors. Class discussion will include treatment of various styles of poetry as well as relevant literary history and theory.
Prerequisite: ENGL 200 or ENGL 200A and ENGL 200B

ENGL 323 H(3-0) STUDIES IN TWENTIETH-CENTURY POETRY
A close study of the theory and practice of modern and contemporary English-language poetics. Class discussion includes consideration of different forms and schools of poetry as well as relevant theory and its applications in practice.
Prerequisite: ENGL 200 or ENGL 200A and ENGL 200B

ENGL 325 H(3-0) Contemporary Literature
A study of literature from the late 20th century to the present. We will examine how ethnicity, gender, and economics have shifted literary and cultural expression into texts of multiplicity and canceled borders. The instructor may choose a different organizing principle from year to year (e.g. award winning books, postcolonial literature, postmodern poetics).
Prerequisite: ENGL 200 or ENGL 200A and ENGL 200B

ENGL 327 H(3-0) STUDIES IN TWENTIETH-CENTURY DRAMA
A study of selected plays of twentieth-century dramatists in Europe, Canada and the United States. Topics to be addressed include the major movements, forms and playwrights of twentieth-century theatre. Texts include representative works of writers such as Ibsen, Strindberg, Brecht, O’Neill, Pirandello, Beckett, Albee, Genet, Churchill, Friel and Tremblay.
Prerequisite: ENGL 200 or ENGL 200A and ENGL 200B

ENGL 331 H(3-0) The Emergence of American Literature: From Revolution to Post-Civil War
An examination of the national literature of the United States from its Revolutionary-era “project phase” in the late eighteenth century to its gradual achievement of international recognition at the opening of the twentieth century. Readings may include some earlier texts from the colonial period, but they will draw primarily on the remarkable achievements of American writers during the nineteenth century: before, during, and after the cataclysmic Civil War.
Prerequisite: ENGL 200 or ENGL 200A and ENGL 200B

ENGL 333 H(3-0) American Literature From the Twentieth Century to Our Time
An examination of the increasingly prolific, diverse, and influential literature of the United States from the early twentieth century to the contemporary moment. The experiments of the American Modernists, the Harlem Renaissance, and the flowering of diverse literary communities (such as Native American, Latino/a, and Asian American) will figure prominently in discussions, as will crucial historical contexts such as the World Wars, the Great Depression, and The Cold War.
Prerequisite: ENGL 200 or ENGL 200A and ENGL 200B

ENGL 334 H(3-0) Rebellion, Progress, Transformation: Topics in American Literature
An examination of a specific historical chapter and/or theme in American Literature. The instructor may choose a different topic to feature in this course from year to year (e.g., U.S. Literature and Popular Culture in the 1960s), but the focus will be selective to enable closer attention to cultural contexts and traditions than in a more standard survey course.
Prerequisite: ENGL 200 or ENGL 200A and ENGL 200B
Antirequisite: ENGL 397.5
Note: Course may be repeated for credit.

ENGL 337 H(3-0) Imagination and Splendour: Romantic Literature
A study of the first and second generations of British Romantic writers in the late eighteenth century to the early nineteenth century. We will examine the rise of the Romantic poet/ego, Romanticism as a cultural phenomenon, and the explosive social role of literature in the context of this rebellious period.
Prerequisite: ENGL 200 or ENGL 200A and ENGL 200B

ENGL 339 H(3-0) STUDIES IN VICTORIAN LITERATURE
A study of English poetry and prose during the Victorian period (circa 1832 to 1901). Developments such as non-fiction prose, dramatic monologues and the great age of the British novel are placed in the context of cultural shifts such as industrialization, urbanization, social reform and self-conception. The instructor will select from major writers such as Carlyle, Tennyson, Barrett-Browning, Charlotte Bronte, Dickens, Tennyson, Arnold, Eliot and Hardy, and will study their works alongside those of non-canonical writers.
Prerequisite: ENGL 200 or ENGL 200A and ENGL 200B

ENGL 341 H(3-0) Possession: Early Canadian Literature
A study of Canadian writing from First Contact to the World Wars. We will explore writers who have built and challenged national identity and literary culture. From oral performance of First Nations and journals of pioneer women to gothic and fantasy novels, we will analyze how Canada’s early artists played with genre and shaped subjectivity to suit their diverse intentions and invent a country’s literature.
Prerequisite: ENGL 200 or ENGL 200A and ENGL 200B

ENGL 343 H(3-0) Unsettling Nation: Modern and Contemporary Canadian Literature
A study of Canadian literary response to cultural change from the second half of the 20th century to the present. We will analyze the most provocative examples of our nation’s poetry, prose and film and trace Canada’s unique expression of postmodernism, multiculturalism, and ecocriticism.
Prerequisite: ENGL 200 or ENGL 200A and ENGL 200B

ENGL 345 H(3-0) CANADIAN LONG POEM
This course will explore an important yet largely under-examined Canadian literary genre – the Canadian Long Poem. Through intensive reading of the works of writers as Fred Wah, Robert Kroetsch, Michael Ondaatje, bp nichol, Daphne Marlatt, Phyllis Webb and Dionne Brand, students will frame and confront a series of questions concerning the nature of the long poem and its place within the literary and historical contexts of Canada. This course focuses on the poetics and practice of key twentieth century texts.
Prerequisite: ENGL 200 or ENGL 200A and ENGL 200B
Note: Formerly ENGL 323.11.

ENGL 351 H(3-0) STUDIES IN ANGLO-IRISH LITERATURE
An exploration of the intersection of cultural, social, and political forces that have produced a distinct body of Anglo-Irish literature. A number of key themes in Anglo-Irish literature will be addressed, including nationalism, identity and the poetic imagination. Topics include main cycles of Irish mythology, the Anglo-Irish revival, the rise of the Abbey Theatre, Yeats, Lady Gregory, Synge, O’Casey, Joyce, Beckett, O’Brien, Friel and modern Irish poets.
Prerequisite: ENGL 200 or ENGL 200A and ENGL 200B

ENGL 353 H(3-0) WORLD LITERATURES
An exploration of world literature from across periods and regions, studied in aesthetic, cultural and political context. In any given year, the instructor may focus on a selection of texts from a region such as the Caribbean or Indian subcontinent, and/or a significant historical period such as literature in translation from the interwar period. Possible topics may include colonial/post-colonial literature, orality versus textuality, translation, gender and the development of genre.
Prerequisite: ENGL 200 or ENGL 200A and ENGL 200B

ENGL 355 H(3-0) STUDIES IN LITERATURE AND THE CATHOLIC TRADITION
A study of the engagement of the imagination with issues of Catholic faith and ethics in the literary tradition. Selection of texts and authors will vary from year to year. Course content may be organized across literary periods and genres to encourage exploration of a faith-related theme in the work of several writers; alternatively, the instructor may focus on a particular time period, genre or author. In addition to English literary texts, course readings may include works in English translation.
Prerequisite: ENGL 200 or ENGL 200A and ENGL 200B

ENGL 357 H(3-0) Medievalisms: Imagining the Medieval from the Middle Ages to Popular Culture
This course will examine western culture’s ongoing interest in its medieval past through a study of representations of the medieval from the Middle Ages to the present. The topic will vary from year to year (e.g. Arthurian Literature, Swords and Sorcery, Crusade Fantasies, etc.). Texts will range widely from Sir Gawain and the Green Knight to Game of Thrones, for example.
Prerequisites: ENGL 200 or ENGL 200A and ENGL 200B

ENGL 359 H(3-0) LIFE WRITING
An exploration of various forms of life writing that may include autobiography, biography, memoir, diary, letters and hybrid texts. Concepts of style, form, voice, agency, intersubjectivity and the contested boundaries between fiction and non-fiction will be examined through the constructed relationships among author, text, and reader. In any given year, the instructor may focus on a particular sub-genre, theme, or topic of life writing. This course will examine the texts as individual works and as representatives of changing modes of autobiographical representation.
Prerequisite: ENGL 200 or ENGL 200A and ENGL 200B

ENGL 361 H(3-0) MEDIA STUDIES: VISUAL CULTURE AND FILM
A study of developments in the visual arts including, but not limited to, photography and film. Students will study visual culture in order to engage critically with the materials and become visually literate. Texts and works under study will vary, as may the period of focus.
Prerequisite: ENGL 200 or ENGL 200A and ENGL 200B

ENGL 363 H(3-0) MEDIA STUDIES: TELEVISION AND NEW MEDIA
A study of developments in visual culture with specific emphasis on television and new media. Students will master the fundamentals of visual analysis in order to engage critically with the use of various media forms and formats. Texts and works under study will vary, as may the period of focus.
Prerequisite: ENGL 200 or ENGL 200A and ENGL 200B

ENGL 371 H(3-0) CREATIVE WRITING: DRAMA
A practical hands-on approach to play writing, based on the workshop model where students submit work and hear it read by other members of the class, and in turn read the work of their fellow students. Students will have a public “recital” at the end of the course, sharing excerpts of their work with the St. Mary’s community. The theoretical will be discussed only as it arises from the actual work.
Prerequisite: ENGL 200 or ENGL 200A and ENGL 200B

ENGL 373 H(3-0) CREATIVE WRITING: PROSE
Using models from world literature and contemporary culture we will examine the two main areas of prose: fiction and creative non-fiction. Of the latter, we will look at forms such as memoir, journaling, profiles and other journalistic possibilities. In terms of fiction, we will examine the short story as it currently stands. What has changed about short stories since they first appeared a century ago, and what remains the same? Has the Internet altered the style of our prose writing? If it has, how can we position ourselves to be viable published writers?
Prerequisites: ENGL 200 or ENGL 200A and ENGL 200B

ENGL 381 H(3-0) MAJOR AUTHORS
This course addresses an author or closely-related pair, group or movement of authors. Emphasis will be on the author’s oeuvre and some or all of the following elements: biography, rivalries, collaborations, correspondences, controversies, shared esthetic/political commitments, or other micro-contextual connections. Course may be repeated for credit.
ENGL 381.1: Chaucer
ENGL 381.2: Andre Dubus
ENGL 381.3: John Irving
ENGL 381.4: Henry James
ENGL 381.5: Romantic & Victorian Writers in Rome
ENGL 381.6: Michael Ondaatje
ENGL 381.7: American Authors in Exile
ENGL 381.8: Alice Munro
Prerequisite: ENGL 200 or ENGL 200A and ENGL 200B
Note: Course may be repeated for credit

ENGL 391 H(3-0) CHILDREN’S LITERATURE
Children’s literature introduces the major genres of written children’s literature: picture books, prose fiction (realistic, fantastic, young adult) and verse. The course examines the historical development and changing conceptions of children and children’s literature. Influences of gender, class, cultural assumptions and literary fashion on the reading, writing and criticism of books for children are explored. This course also introduces students to techniques for close reading of children’s texts.
Prerequisite: ENGL 200 or ENGL 200A and ENGL 200B
Antirequisties: ENGL 390

ENGL 394 H(3-0) Topics in Literary and Cultural Theory
A study focused on a special topic and/or critical approach in contemporary theory. Content will vary from year to year, but might include, for example, Environmental Criticism, Feminisms, Historicisms, Queer Theory, or Decolonization.
Prerequisite: ENGL 200 or ENGL 200A and ENGL 200B
Note: Course may be repeated for credit.

ENGL 397 H(3-0) SPECIAL TOPICS IN LITERATURE
An exploration of a special topic in literature through the application of approaches that cross literary periods, genres and academic disciplines. Content will be variable from year to year.
ENGL 397.1: Reading & Writing the Short Story
ENGL 397.2: Gothic Fiction
ENGL 397.3: Early American Novel
ENGL 397.4: Folk & Fairy Tales
ENGL 397.5: U.S. Literature & Popular Culture in the 1960s
ENGL 397.6: Literature & Social Change
ENGL 397.7: Demons & Diviners: Creativity & Madness in Literature
ENGL 397.8: Compassion, Sympathy, Empathy
Prerequisite: ENGL 200 or ENGL 200A and ENGL 200B
Note: This course may be repeated for credit.

ENGL 399 H(3-0) DIRECTED READING IN A LITERARY TOPIC
A course of directed reading and writing to meet the needs of individual students who wish to pursue an area of study not covered by current course offerings. Enrolment will be capped at four. Students will meet the professor once a week in a structured tutorial and produce a major project showing extensive independent exploration of the subject area.
Prerequisite: ENGL 200 or ENGL 200A and ENGL 200B, and at least three credits in English at the senior level.

ENGL 401 H(3-0) SENIOR SEMINAR
This course builds on a foundation of studies in English and requires that senior students demonstrate mastery of methods of academic research, critical writing and oral defence of reasoned argument. In service of these goals, students will develop independent research projects in conjunction with the instructor and in concert with fellow seminar participants. The course will culminate with an academic conference in which participants present their own research in a professional manner and defend their conclusions in a forum open to all members of the University community.
Prerequisite: ENGL 200 or ENGL 200A and ENGL 200B, and ENGL 465

ENGL 465 H(3-0) Advanced Literary Research Methods
This course will provide an introduction to advanced research methods in English literary scholarship. Students will consider a variety of approaches to literary research, including: archival research, critical history, textual scholarship, qualitative and quantitative analysis. Students will research and write a formal research proposal on a topic of their own choice.
Prerequisites: Must have completed either two full years (a minimum of 54 credits) of a 3-year BA with a concentration in English or three full years (a minimum of 84 credits) of a 4-year BA with a major in English

ENGL 467 H(3-0) INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY THEORY AND CRITICISM
A study of representative readings in literary theory and criticism, from classical rhetoric to twentieth-century literary commentary, and examination of critical concepts such as representation and mimesis, discourse, narrative, ideology and subjectivity. Assignments provide practice in the application of theory to literary texts.
Prerequisite: ENGL 200 or ENGL 200A and ENGL 200B, and at least six credit hours in English at the senior level

ENGL 469 H(3-0) MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY LITERARY THEORY AND CRITICISM
A continuation of ENGL 467, this course examines the claims and assumptions of modern and contemporary literary theory from early twentieth-century formalism to current critical practice. Readings and assignments encourage engagement with a variety of critical approaches such as structuralism, deconstruction, feminism and gender studies, new historicism, psychoanalytical criticism, and cultural and ideological critique.
Prerequisites: ENGL 200 or ENGL 200A and ENGL 200B, and ENGL 467 and at least six credit hours in English at the senior level

F

FMST 301 H (3-0) Introduction to Family Studies
This course examines the family studies field from a systemic perspective. Some of the topics explored may include: Genogram, Attachment Theory, Risk and Resilience after Divorce, and Normative Family Transitions. Learning will take place through a combination of theoretical input, case studies, student presentations and personal reflection.
Prerequisites: 30 credits or permission of the instructor.

FMST 303 H (3-0) Contemporary Concerns for Families
This course examines the issues facing contemporary families, including PTSD, addictions, relocations, cultural and diversity concerns, economic climate impact, illness and death in the family unit.
Prerequisite: FMST 301

FMST 401 H(3-0) THE HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT OF FAMILY THERAPY
This course examines the family therapy movement from an historical perspective and introduces the student to the major schools of family therapy.
Prerequisite: At least six senior credits in a related discipline: e.g., psychology and sociology. SOCI 371 is highly recommended.

FMST 411 H (3-0) Family Narratives
This course presents the concepts, principles, and applications of narrative theory. Concepts of narrative, metaphor, and context ground an exploration of the ways that stories shape people’s lives.
Prerequisites: FMST 401 or at least six credits in a related discipline, e.g. psychology and sociology.

FREN 209 H(4-1T) BEGINNERS’ FRENCH I
Basic elements of the French language, including training in comprehension, speaking, reading and writing of French.
Note: Not open to students with credit in French 20, French 30, or French 31 (or equivalent)

FREN 211 H(4-1T) BEGINNERS’ FRENCH II
A continuation of FREN 209, this course teaches the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing French. The course prepares students for advanced study of French by providing a solid grounding in the language, literature and culture of the Francophone world.
Prerequisite: FREN 209
Note: Not open to students with credit in French 30 or French 31 (or equivalent)

FREN 219 H(4-1T) FIRST-YEAR UNIVERSITY FRENCH I
Development of students’ abilities in spoken and written French, building upon knowledge of basic grammar, composition and literature.
Prerequisite: French 30 or FREN 211

FREN 221 H(4-1T) FIRST-YEAR UNIVERSITY FRENCH II
A continuation of FREN 219, with additional grammatical structures, vocabulary, composition and literature.
Prerequisite: FREN 219

FREN 319 H(3-0) SENIOR FRENCH COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION I
A senior course in French language composition and conversation offering a systematic in-depth review of certain problematic grammar structures and an initiation in composition techniques.
Prerequisite: FREN 221

FREN 321 H(3-0) SENIOR FRENCH COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION II
A senior course in French language composition and conversation that is a continuation of FREN 319. It offers further review of problematic grammar structures and practice in composition techniques.
Prerequisite: FREN 319

G

GEOG 203 H(3-0) THE HUMAN ENVIRONMENT
This course introduces key concepts in human geography and explores the spatial organization of human activities and the interaction between humans and the environment. Topics to be examined include demographic change, mobility and migration, development and resource use, urban and rural environments, landscape and culture, and territory and geopolitics.

GEOG 213 H(3-0) GEOGRAPHY OF WORLD AFFAIRS
An introduction to the basic characteristics of and differences between the major cultural realms of the contemporary world in order to more properly comprehend current problems and world affairs. Particular emphasis will be given to description and characteristics of each cultural realm on the basis of physical geography, historical background, population demographics, political situation, cultural background and economy.

GEOG 381 H(3-0) CANADA
A study of the regional geography of Canada, particularly the physical framework and its importance in the history of Canada. Using detailed studies, the course covers the concept of geographic region and the patterns and characteristics of selected regions.
Note: A previous course in geography is strongly recommended

H

HIST 200A (3-0) HISTORY OF IDEAS: ANTIQUITY TO THE REFORMATION
This seminar course explores the history of western thought from Antiquity to the Reformation through an examination of original writings. The focus is on how ideas, originating in the disciplines of philosophy, science, politics, religion, economics, literature, art, and psychology have shaped Western Civilization over the centuries. The course enables students to make connections between ideas and society, to think and write critically, analytically, and synthetically, and to speak effectively.
Antirequisite: HIST 200

HIST 200B (3-0) HISTORY OF IDEAS: SCIENTIFIC REVOLUTION TO THE 20TH CENTURY
This seminar course explores the history of western thought from the Scientific Revolution to the 20th Century through an examination of original writings. The focus is on how ideas, originating in the disciplines of philosophy, science, politics, religion, economics, literature, art, and psychology have shaped Western Civilization over the centuries. The course enables students to make connections between ideas and society, to think and write critically, analytically, and synthetically, and to speak effectively.
Prerequisties: HIST 200A
Antirequisite: HIST 200

HIST 201 H(3-0) INTRODUCTION TO CANADIAN HISTORY: BEGINNINGS TO CONFEDERATION
An introduction to some of the major themes in Canada’s social, economic, political and cultural development to 1867.
Note: Companion course to HIST 203

HIST 203 H(3-0) INTRODUCTION TO CANADIAN HISTORY: CONFEDERATION TO THE PRESENT
An introduction to some of the central themes in Canada’s social, economic, political and cultural development since confederation.
Note: Companion course to HIST 201

HIST 205 H(3-0) WORLD HISTORY TO 1500
This course is an historical survey of the principal social, political, economic and intellectual developments that have shaped the world from ancient civilizations to 1500. Topics to be studied include prehistoric human organization; the rise and decline of ancient civilization; classical ages in Greece, Rome, China, Africa and the Americas; and the European Middle Ages.

HIST 207 H(3-0) THE WORLD SINCE 1500
This course is an historical survey of the principal social, political, economic and intellectual developments that have shaped the world since 1500. Topics to be studied include exploration, imperialism and colonialism, cross-cultural contact, war and revolution, modernization, and industrialization.

HIST 301 H(3-0) TOPICS IN WORLD AND COMPARATIVE HISTORY
This course explores select topics in world and comparative history. The content of the course is likely to change each time it is offered and may thus be repeated for credit with permission.

HIST 303 H(3-0) WOMEN IN EARLY CHRISTIANITY
This course investigates the role and representation of women in early Christianity from the period of Jesus’ ministry to the 5th century AD. The course study includes specific historical women attitudes toward women and constructions of female gender as they relate to ideas and behaviours in early Christianity. The emphasis of this course rests on primary sources and their interpretation, using feminist, historical, socio-cultural, theological and literary methods to explore the ways in which women are represented in canonical and non-canonical sources.
Note: Credit for both HIST 303 and THEO 343 will not be allowed.

HIST 305 H(3-0) War, Peace, and Society
What are th casues and distinctive characteristic of contemporary conflict? Are they different in any respect from the casues or characteristics of prior wars? The seminar style course focuses on an assessment of armed conflict at the beginning of the 21st century with particular emphasis on ethnic and internal conflict. Students will evaluate the potential effectiveness of a range of strategies for preventing, abating, and terminating current form of conflict.
Antirequisties: HIST 301.2

HIST 307 H(3-0) CLASSICAL STUDIES: GREEK AND ROMAN HISTORY
This course looks at the ancient cultures of Greece and Rome focusing on their cultural, political, literary and economic Issues. We begin with Bronze Age Greece and continue through the dissolution of the Roman Empire.
Note: Credit for both HIST 307 and CLAS 315 will not be allowed.

HIST 309 H(3-0) INTRODUCTION TO JUDAISM
This course provides a survey of the history, theology, ritual and practise of Judaism. A survey of the biblical foundations in the Torah, prophets, and post-exilic restoration to Judah provides the foundation for a treatment of subsequent developments in Judaism up to the present era. Topics include the formation of the Torah, the Mishnah and the Talmud; traditions of prayer; history of European Jewry; tensions with the Christian Church; the Jewish Year; Hasidism; the development of anti-Semitism; responses to modernity; the emergence of Zionism, and contemporary life in a synagogue.
Note: Credit for both HIST 309 and RLGS 363 will not be allowed.

HIST 311 H(3-0) CHRISTIANITY AND EMPIRE, ORIGINS TO 1492
This course explores the historical engagement of various Christian traditions with the prevailing political, social and ethnic cultures in the western world and beyond. Students will also examine the development of Christianity as it confronts changes in the symbolic an dintellectual universes over the first 1,500 years of Christina life and thought. The course: describes the prominent figures and theological debates that led to controversies in the early church, delves into the new challenges and opportunities that faced the imperial church, and surveys the rich diversity of Christianity in the Latin West and Byzantine East during the Middle Ages.
Note: Credit for both HIST 311 and THEO 345 will not be allowed.

HIST 313 H(3-0) CHRISTIANITY, CONQUEST and SCIENCE, 1492 TO PRESENT
This course explores the momentous events of post-Reformation Christianity as it engages with the prevailing political, social and ethnic cultures around the world. Students will also examine the development of Protestant, Catholic, and Orthodox Christianities as they confront changes in the symbolic and intellectual universes. Beginning with the Protestant Reformation of the sixteenth century, this course surveys; the missionary ventures in the 16th and 17th centuries and the establishment of colonial Christianity in the New World; the struggles between science and faith during the Enlightenment and later; and how Christianity responded to modernity in the twentieth century and postmodernity in the twenty-first.
Prerequisites: RLGS 201 or THEO 201
Note: Credit for both HIST 313 and RLGS 333 will not be allowed.

HIST 315 H(3-0) AUGUSTINE OF HIPPO:HISLIFE, TIMES AND THOUGHT
This course offers an introduction to the life, times and thought of Augustine of Hippo. Augustine’s life and thought are examined within the historical and socio-political context of late antiquity and his far reaching legacy in Christian thought and practice are considered.
Prerequisites: RLGS 205, THEO 201
Note: Credit for both HIST 315 and THEO 339 will not be allowed.

HIST 317 H(3-0) Medieval Women Mystics
This course investigates the mystical and visionary experiences of women in the medieval period in Europe, focusing on the representation of gender in their writings and the cultural contexts of their lives. We will read texts written by women including Hildegard of Bingen, Hadewijch of Brabant, Mechthild of Magdeburg, Catherine of Siena, Julian of Norwich and Margery Kempe. We will learn the stories of their lives, explore the varieties of their spiritual practices and consider the images they employ to convey their unique visions of the divine.
Note: Credit for both RLGS 341 and HIST 317 will not be allowed.

HIST 319 H(3-0) THOMAS AQUINAS: HIS LIFE, TIMES AND THOUGHT
This course is an investigation into the life and thought of the mediaeval philosopher, Thomas Aquinas. It will examine the
life of the Dominican scholar from within the historical and sociopolitical context of the 13th century Europe. The course will conduct a thorough philosophical examination of Aquinas’ intellectual inheritance from Aristotle, in addition to his contributions to theories of knowledge, metaphysics and human nature. Finally, the course will offer a detailed philosophical investigation of Aquinas’ moral theories, ethics and their relationship to natural law and political thought.
Prerequisites: PHIL 351
Note: Credit for both HIST 319 and PHIL 345 will not be allowed.

HIST 321 H(3-0) MEDIEVAL EUROPE
This course surveys the society and culture of western Europe from the fourth to the fifteenth century. Through lectures, discussion, reading, simulations and written work, students will acquire a familiarity with the major events, trends and important themes in the medieval period, with an emphasis on institutional history.

HIST 323 H(3-0) EARLY MODERN EUROPE, 1500-1750
The evolution of European society, culture and religion from the sixteenth to the middle of the eighteenth century. Topics to be examined include the Renaissance, the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, the Wars of Religion, Dynastic Politics and the Enlightenment.

HIST 327 H(3-0) THE VICTORIAN WORLD, 1837-1899
This course will examine the world of the Victorians, both within Britain and in its imperial possessions, colonies and self-governing dominions. Topics will vary but may include imperialism and imperial warfare, the development of the self-governing colonies, the role of missionaries and missionary societies, explorers and exploration, culture and consumption, the relationship between science and religion, society and urbanization, art and literature, and technological and industrial development.

HIST 329 H(3-0) MODERN EUROPE, 1750-1918
Trends in European thought, culture, society and politics from the middle of the eighteenth century to the end of the First World War. Topics include the rise of the nation-state, the French Revolution and Napoleonic Europe, the industrial revolution, imperialism and the origins of the First World War.

HIST 331 H(3-0) TWENTIETH-CENTURY EUROPE, 1900 TO THE PRESENT
This course will examine the major themes in twentieth-century European history. Topics include the origins, courses and influences of the world wars; the interwar period; the rise of totalitarianism; imperial retreat; the origins of the Cold War; the rise of the welfare state; and the decadence of the 1960s. The course will focus on culture, society, politics, international relations and economics in order to gain as broad an impression of the time period as possible.

HIST 335 H(3-0) Medieval Spain: Christians, Jews, and Muslims
For approximately seven centuries, Christians, Jews and Muslims shared the same geographic space, creating a shared culture of religious tolerance historians have termed “convivencia” (living together-ness). Yet at the same time, warfare along religious lines was not uncommon, and there can be no denying the evidence of religious and ethnic intolerance. This course surveys medieval and early modern Iberia focusing on the interactions between Muslims, Christians, and Jews living there between 711 and 1502 C.E.

HIST 337 H(3-0) Revolutinos and Reformations: Tudor and Stuart Britain
From the rise of the Tudors in 1485, to the Glorious Revolution of William and Mary in 1688, this course examines the dramatic changes occurring in Britain during the early modern period. Special attention will be paid to the key religious and intellectual movements of the period and how they shaped the society, culture, and politics of the era/

HIST 341 H(3-0) HISTORY OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES IN CANADA
The course examines the pattern of European-Indigenous relations in Canada from first contact to contemporary times, examining the impact of differing world views between the two societies. Topics include the conflicting views of governments and indigenous peoples with regard to the meaning of treaties, control of traditional lands, and the political and cultural efforts of indigenous peoples to assert their rights in contemporary society through restitution and reconciliation.

HIST 343 H(3-0) COLD WAR CANADA 1945 TO 1991
This course provides an examination of Canada’s role in the Cold War, both in the realm of international relations and in domestic affairs. It addresses the controversial diplomatic, military, political, religious, cultural and social debates which emerged with the dawning of the Atomic age and the ever present threat of an apocalyptic nuclear war between the world’s two greatest superpowers, the United States and the Soviet Union.

HIST 345 H(3-0) TOPICS IN THE HISTORY OF POPULAR CULTURE IN CANADA
An examination of the popular pastimes, amusements, ideas, attitudes and values that have defined the lives of “ordinary” Canadians. Topics include the cultures of class, gender and ethnicity; manners and morals; fads and fashions; public holidays and celebrations; recreation and leisure; popular literature; advertising and mass media. These topics are studied within the context of the principal social and economic developments that shaped Canadian society and culture.

HIST 347 H(3-0) THE HISTORY OF WESTERN CANADA
A topical survey of Western Canadian history from pre-contact times to the present. Subjects to be examined include Aboriginal societies and cultures, the fur trade, settlement and immigration, protest and reform movements, resource development and exploitation, culture and religion. Particular emphasis is placed on the roles played by gender, class and ethnicity in shaping Western Canadian society.

HIST 349 H(3-0) THE HISTORY OF RELIGION IN CANADA
An analysis of the role and impact of religion in Canadian society. Topics include Native belief systems, the transplantation of Western religions, missions, revivals and awakenings, social reform, church and state relations, secularization and modernization.

HIST 351 H(3-0) THE HISTORY OF THE NORTH AMERICAN FAMILY
The changing nature of the family and gender roles in North American society beginning with the First Nations to the present. Topics include family formation, production and reproduction, marriage law and customs, families and the church and state, children and child rearing, family dysfunction and the elderly.

HIST 353 H(3-0) HISTORY OF GENDER IN CANADA
This course examines gender history in Canada from pre-industrial times to the present. It explores the historical development of gender norms, identities and roles as they have been shaped and changed by cultural, economic, and political factors. Students are introduced to the history of the field, highlighting recent developments, and explore the variety of ways in which historians incorporate gendered analyses into their work.

HIST 355 H(3-0) Saints, scoundrels and Scallawags: Historical Biography
Biography helps shape our understanding of the past by providing important insights into a historical period. Biography is a way of telling history through the reconstruction of the life of an individual and the historical context in which they lived. This course examines the lives of diverse Canadians who figured prominently in the social, political, and/or cultural landscapes of their times. Special emphasis is placed on the methodology of historians in constructing biography regarding questions of memory, selectivity, and objectivity.

HIST 357 H(3-0) AN ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY OF CANADA: PEOPLE, POLITICS, PROTEST
The course examines the cause, effect, and mitigation of environmental degradation and disaster in Canada, through an investigation of the interplay between human activity and the natural environment from the pre-contact period to the end of the twentieth century. Topics include resource exploitation and habitat destruction; chemical pollution of soil, air, and water; endangered species; and environmental issues related to war. Case studies reveal the emergence of environmental awareness and activism over rising concerns for human health and sustainability in a mass consumer society.

HIST 363 H(3-0) THE UNITED STATES TO 1877
An examination of the evolution of American society from its colonial beginnings to the end of the Reconstruction era. Emphasis is placed on the principal social, economic, political, cultural and intellectual developments that shaped and defined American life.

HIST 365 H(3-0) THE UNITED STATES SINCE 1877
An examination of the evolution of American society from the end of the Reconstruction Era to the present. Emphasis is placed on the principal social, economic, political, cultural and intellectual developments that shaped and defined the United States.

HIST 367 H(3-0) THE HISTORY OF AMERICAN POPULAR CULTURE
This course examines the historical, social and cultural development of American popular culture from the middle of the nineteenth century to the present focusing on how forms of mass entertainment both shaped and have been shaped by critical developments of the evolution of American society. Particular emphasis is placed on studying popular entertainment’s influence of gender, race and class.

HIST 375 H(3-0) Colonial Latin American History
This course surveys the society and culture of Latin America (Mexico, the Caribbean and South America) from the pre- Columbian period through the “discovery” of the Americas by Europeans, up to the independence movements of the 18th century. Through lectures and discussion of primary sources, students will become familiar with the major events of the colonial period, focusing on how indigenous, European, and African cultures melded in this time and space.

HIST 377 H(3-0) THE HISTORY OF MODERN LATIN AMERICA
A survey of Latin American nations since independence. Particular attention will be given to political change, economic dependency and modernization, social and economic revolution and inter-American relations.

HIST 381 H(3-0) Rome and Christian Spirituality
This course has special costs and required international travel. This travel study course explores the development of Christian spirituality from its origins to the present day through the lens of Rome. From ancient imperial capital to centre of the Roman Catholic Church today, Rome presents a living history like no other city. This course examines how Christians throughout history have approached God in prayer and practice, and how these diverse spiritualties have intersected with art, architectures, politics, and culture.
Note: Credit for both RLGS 305 and HIST 381 will not be allowed.

HIST 391 H(3-30P) Public History: Memory and Method
In this course students will gain a better understanding of the process of modern historical inquiry and the diverse resources that historians use to conduct research. They will refine their knowledge of historical research methods and the tools and techniques that historians use to study the past. This course investigates the challenges of historical work in historic sites, museums, archives, as well as the recounting of historical events through public art, film, digital media, television, monuments, and memorials. Issues to be examined include how history is communicated to the public; how public history sites contribute to public memory; controversies in public history settings; the relationship between academic history and public history; the heritage industry; and career opportunities beyond the academy. This lecture-based course has a practicum component of 30 hours.
Prerequisites: 6 credits in History at the senior level or permission of the instructor

HIST 395 H(3-0) FILM AND HISTORY
This course looks at film as an historical artifact and as a source of social, cultural and intellectual history. The focus is primarily, but not exclusively, on the history of American film. Topics include film and the creation of mass culture; film and the making of cultural myth; film and the construction of gender, race, and ethnicity and film as a source of propaganda.

HIST 397 H(3-0) CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY
This course considers questions central to recent and current debates in the philosophy of history, from R.G. Collingwood to the present. The questions include: “What is the nature of historical explanation?”, “What does it mean to say that historians provide knowledge of the past or historical knowledge?”, “Do the works of historians give us fact or fiction or a mixture of the two?”, “What implications does historical narrative have for claims to historical truth?”, “What implications does the ‘linguistic turn’ in history, have for the work of historians?”. Prerequisites: PHIL 200, any history course, or permission of the instructor
Note: Credit for both HIST 397 and PHIL 399 will not be
allowed.

HIST 401 F(3-0) THE HISTORIAN’S CRAFT
Designed for the History Major, this seminar course provides a hands-on exploration of History as both a professional field and a scholarly discipline. The course provides an in-depth examination of historiography and methods in history and offers opportunities to apply research, writing and interpretive skills through intensive work with sources, texts, and other historical evidence. This course is to be completed in the final year of study.

HIST 403 H(3-0) Major Research Project
Designed for History Majors in their final year of study, this capstone course allows students to apply their research, critical thinking, analytical, interpretive and communication skills through the completion of a major research project involving both secondary and primary sources on a topic of the student’s choice under the supervision of a faculty advisor. The project will be presented at a student conference at the completion of the term.
Prerequisites: HIST 401

HIST 499 H(3-0) DIRECTED READING ON AN HISTORICAL TOPIC
A course of directed reading, writing and research to meet the needs of individual students who wish to pursue an area of study not covered by the current course offerings. The course is structured around weekly tutorial discussions of required readings and the completion of a major research paper.
Prerequisites: HIST 200 or HIST 200A and HIST 200B, and at least three credits in history at the senior level

HMKN 201 H(2-3L) PHYSICAL ACTIVITY: ESSENCE AND EXPERIENCE
This activity-theory course is designed to provide the student with experience in various activities and movement patterns and insight into the fundamental factors influencing the activities we choose and the way we move. Lectures will introduce students to the history, skill fundamentals, basic movement mechanisms and regulations for various activities. Laboratory sessions will involve practical application of lecture material to playing situations, with emphasis on critical analysis of movement patterns and skill acquisition for the chosen activities.
Note: Does not fulfill Natural and Mathematical Sciences requirement.

HMKN 203 H(2-3L) ASSESSMENT FOR HEALTH AND PERFORMANCE
This activity-theory course is designed to provide the student with knowledge of the link between physical activity and health, and to provide experience in implementation and evaluation of cardiovascular, strength and flexibility training. Lectures will introduce students to the importance of physical activity in daily living for maintenance of physical fitness and health, and to the periodization principle for fitness programs. Laboratory sessions will involve preliminary and post-term fitness testing to provide performance criteria from which the students will assess the efficacy of their training program. Lectures and text will reinforce the learning of exercise prescription and evaluation.
Note: Does not fulfill Natural and Mathematical Sciences requirement.

HMKN 205 H(3-0) HUMAN NUTRITION
An introduction to the role of nutrition in human health and fitness. Key issues include fundamental principles of nutrition, consumer information, energy balance, common inherited and acquired disorders, age-related special requirements, special diets, and dietary supplements.

HMKN 211 H(3 -0) LEADERSHIP AND COMMUNICATION
This course is designed to provide the student with the concepts and theories involved in leadership and the development of interpersonal communication skills. Each student will be required to adapt and apply the concepts and theories presented in lectures to practical experiences in individual and small- and large-group situations as they apply to the field of human kinetics/kinesiology.
NOTE: Does not fulfill Natural and Mathematical Sciences requirement.

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INST 201 H(3-0) Introduction to Indigenous Studies
This course is an introduction to the study of Indigenous Peoples in what is now called Canada, addressing historically constructed and contemporary views of Indigenous peoples and their rights as guaranteed under the Canadian Constitution. Through course lectures, seminar discussions, and experiential learning, this course explores the history of Treaty 7, the nations within the Province of Alberta, and the diversity of Nations within Canada.

INST 301 H(3-0) Indigenous Knowledge Field Course
This field course is a land-based experiential offering, designed to give students practical experience in Indigenous ways of knowing and being, including learning through storytelling, talking circles, ceremony, Indigenous games and song, and learning from the land. Cultural outdoor activities address the four aspects of being – physical, emotional, mental and spiritual – in a holistic way through traditional teachings that give light to roles, responsibilities and protocols. An Elder will be on site to provide guidance, answer questions and provide the integration of learning throughout the course. The course will include the opportunity to experience ceremony including a teaching sweat lodge.
Note: There will be a field course fee.
Pre-requisite: INST 201 and an interview with the Instructor.

IDST 301 H(3-0) CONTEMPORARY MEDITERRANEAN CULTURES
This field study course offers students the opportunity to travel to selected Mediterranean countries. Each student acquires, through first hand observation, and experiential knowledge about each country’s unique identity and values, its contemporary social and cultural issues and its educational systems. The students also learn about the cultural, educational, religious, artistic and historical developments which shape the customs and traditions of each society. There will be a particular focus on issues of social justice in these societies as they affect the contemporary global situation.

IDST 333 H(3-0) READING THE LANDSCAPE: LOCAL EXPLORATIONS IN LITERATURE, ECOLOGY, AND HISTORY
Student in this course will study Southern Alberta’s wilderness spaces: the ecologies that compose them, the histories that have affected them (and been affected by them), as well as the cultural meanings that people have attached to them. Looking beyond this regionalist focus, the course engages contemporary debates about the ways in which humans interact and identify with the lands they inhabit; students will familiarize themselves with the interdisciplinary issues that have triggered those debates and the critical/scientific vocabularies that have framed them.
Prerequisite: 45 credits or permission of the instructor.

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LATI 201 H(3-0) AN INTRODUCTION TO LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE I
An introduction to Latin language and literature through a combination of classroom instruction and directed work on language-learning exercises. Students will become familiar with Latin vocabulary, sentence patterns and parts of speech, and will learn to recognize basic verb conjugations, noun declensions and Latin pronouns. The course will also provide enhancement of ability in English reading and writing through study of word derivations, common grammatical principles and Latin-to-English translation exercises.

LATI 203 H(3-0) AN INTRODUCTION TO LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE II
A continuation of LATI 201, expanding on Latin vocabulary and introducing more complex grammatical forms, allowing the student to translate higher levels of Latin prose.
Prerequisite: LATI 201

LBST 201 H(3-0) INTRODUCTION TO LIBERAL STUDIES
The Liberal Arts Studies experience is a critical part of a liberal arts education students will receive at St. Mary’s University. Among the many emphases in a liberal arts education is the cultivation of skills that will make students active, independent learners, an appreciation of broad and varied perspectives, and the ability to critically analyze issues and make informed and thoughtful choices, whether it be in the classroom, on the job, or in personal life.

LBST 201 introduces students to the notion of the university, interdisciplinarity, and scholarly engagement. Through a variety of readings and assignments, the course fosters a sense of belonging in the learning community, promotes engagement in the academic and co-curricular life of the University, and helps students make a successful transition to university.
Note: Assignments are similar among sections of LBST 201 but each section will have its own instructor and theme.

LBST 301 H(3-0) WAYS OF SEEING, WAYS OF KNOWING
This course has three main divisions: first, an extended analysis of the concept of knowledge as it is used and defined in the Areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, and Natural & Mathematical Sciences; second, a consideration of the methodology of and some of the dominant methods used by the disciplines in the three major Areas; and, third, the use of epistemology (the study of knowledge) and methodology to introduce both the concept of interdisciplinarity and the practice of interdisciplinary research and writing.
Prerequisites: ENGL 200 or ENGL 200A and ENGL 200B; HIST 200 or HIST 200A and HIST 200B; LBST 201

LBST 401: H(3-0) Seminar in Interdisciplinary Studies
This seminar brings together senior students to enhance their understanding of interdisciplinary practices by focusing on significant questions, issues, or themes. Students will discuss, compare, and integrate perspectives, knowledge and methods gained through the Liberal Studies program and apply their learning to frame a major project to be undertaken in LBST 403. Students will explore practical applications of interdisciplinary studies to understand how a liberal studies education can help them become active and engaged members of society.
Prerequisite: LBST 301.

LBST 403 H(3-0) LIBERAL STUDIES INTERDISCIPLINARY PROJECT
This interdisciplinary seminar brings together senior students with different concentrations in the Liberal Studies program to focus on significant questions, issues, or themes. The seminar builds on students’ research and preparation in LBST 401 to communicate their insights through an oral presentation and an interdisciplinary project.
Prerequisites: LBST 401

LING 301 H(3-0) THE HISTORY AND STRUCTURE OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE
This course introduces students to the main issues of language analysis and description applied to English, and presents a picture of the English sound system, morphology and syntax, as well as a short survey of the history and sociology of English.
Prerequisite: ENGL 200 or ENGL 200A and ENGL 200B, or three credit hours of a university-level language other than English.

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MGST 291 H(3-3T) INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT
This course introduces the functional areas of business and the integration of these areas for effective and efficient operation of organizations in a variety of sectors. The course emphasizes effective teamwork skills, research skills and decision-making skills in the study of problems and issues encountered by organizations. MGST 291 provides a foundation for senior management courses.

MGST 301 H(3-0) Contemporary Issues in Management and Business
This course explores select topics in management and business. The content of this course is likely to change each time it is offered and may thus be repeated for credit with permission. The focus of this course is to identify, examine, and explore the impact of current forces, trends and events as they are relevant in the sub-disciplines within management and business. As current events, policies and strategies evolve, as will the material and content each time this course is offered.
MGST 301.0: Strategic Marketing
MGST 301.1: Business and Social Media
Suggested prerequisites: MGST 291
Note: Course may be repeated for credit with permission.

MGST 305 H(3-0) MANAGING PEOPLE AND ORGANIZATIONS
This course addresses the key concepts, common practices, major roles and functions associated with the discipline of human resource management.

MGST 321 H(3-3L) FUNDAMENTALS OF MARKETING
An introductory marketing course designed to introduce the principles and practices of marketing from both an organizational and societal perspective. Topics will cover basic marketing concepts, societal issues, ethics, and the decision-making process of marketers as they develop marketing strategies and plans. The focus of the course will be on the implementation of specific product, pricing, promotion, distribution and communication strategies for specific market solutions.
Prerequisite: MGST 291

MGST 331 H(3-0) Organizational Teamwork and Leadership
Students develop an understanding of the processes, design and nature of effective teamwork and leadership as well as a practical experimental application of theory from lectures. Topics include: importance of teams, team building, team evaluation and accountability, team leadership in the workplace, team motivation, tools and models of leadership, and the recognition of key theories of leadership development. Students will learn new skills and behaviours that will enhance their ability to lead others.
Suggested Prerequisites: MGST 291

MATH 105 H(3-2L) ELEMENTARY MATHEMATICS, ALGEBRA AND TRIGONOMETRY
Relations and functions, inequalities, polynomial functions, rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, sequences and series.
Note: Credit for this course cannot be used toward a degree at St. Mary’s University. The course serves as an alternative to or review of Pure Mathematics 30 where required as a prerequisite. Students of this course will be charged an academic upgrading fee.
Prerequisite: Pure Mathematics 20 or Mathematics 20-1

MATH 205 H(3-1T) MATHEMATICS APPRECIATION
This course will provide students with a contemporary mathematical perspective and experiences in mathematical thinking, as well as historical material on the development of classical mathematical ideas and the evolution of recent mathematics. Topics will be selected by the instructor.
Prerequisites: Mathematics 20-1 or Mathematics 20-2 or MAthematics 20-3
Note: Not open for credit for those intending to major or minor in mathematics or sciences.

MATH 211 H(3-2T) ELEMENTARY LINEAR ALGEBRA
Topics include linear equations, matrix algebra, determinants, vector algebra, elements of coordinate geometry, polar coordinates and complex numbers, basis and linear independence in n-space, linear transformations and their applications.
Prerequisite: Pure Mathematics 30, MATH 30-1 or MATH 105

MATH 249 H(4-2T) INTRODUCTORY CALCULUS
Topics include algebraic operations, functions and graphs, transcendental functions, limits, derivatives, integrals and the fundamental theorem of calculus and their applications.
Prerequisite: Pure Mathematics 30, MATH 30-1, MATH 030 or MATH 105

MATH 251 H(3-2T) CALCULUS I
Topics include functions and graphs, transcendental functions, limits, derivatives, integrals and the fundamental theorem of calculus and their applications.
Prerequisites: Mathematics 31 and one of Pure Mathematics 30, Mathematics 30-1, MATH 030 or MATH 105

MATH 253 H(3-2T) CALCULUS II
Topics include exponential and trigonometric functions and their inverses, hyperbolic function, methods of integration, improper integrals, separable differential equations, first and second order linear differential equations and their applications.
Prerequisite: MATH 249 or MATH 251

MUSI 205 F(1.5-0) CHORAL PERFORMANCE I
College chorus provides interested and qualified singers with opportunities to sing great choral music, to gain performing experience and to meet other students with like interests. The course will include stylistic practice and performance of major choral literature from the fifteenth through twenty-first centuries. The choral group, consisting of college students and singers from the community, meets once a week during the University’s Fall and Winter terms for full choir rehearsals and sectionals, leading to a public performance at the end of each term.
Note: This is a full-year course worth three credits. Community members who wish to participate in this course should refer to the Registration and Fees section of the Academic Calendar for additional information.

MUSI 207 H(3-0) MUSIC APPRECIATION: THE ART OF LISTENING
This course is recommended for students with little or no previous musical background and is designed as an introduction to the Western art music tradition from the Middle Ages to the present day. Students will be given the opportunity to enhance their listening skills; write and speak about music using technical terms and concepts; recognize specific pieces, their genres and composers; discern historical time periods and styles; approach music as both an intellectual and emotional activity; and recognize parallel developments in the other art forms. Attendance at a small number of live performances is required.

MUSI 305 F(1.5-0) CHORAL PERFORMANCE II
Experienced choral performers will gain performing experience with choral literature. Under the direction of the choral conductor, they will improve their vocal skills, their understanding of musical forms and the nature of choral music.
Prerequisite: MUSI 205
Note: This is a full-year course worth three credits. Community members who wish to participate in this course should refer to the Registration and Fees section of the Academic Calendar for additional information.

MUSI 405 F(1.5-0) CHORAL PERFORMANCE III
The St. Mary’s University choir provides interested and qualified students with opportunities to sing choral music from a wide variety of historical periods. It includes stylistic practice and performance of representative works of choral literature from the Renaissance period to the present day. The choir, composed of college students and singers from the community, meets once per week during the Fall and Winter terms. The choir participates in the cultural and religious life of the community by participating in various college events throughout the year: e.g. end of term Mass, fund-raising dinners, convocation.
Prerequisite: MUSI 305
Note: This is a full-year course worth three credits. Community members who wish to participate in this course should refer to the Registration and Fees section of the Academic Calendar for additional information.

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PHIL 211 H(3-0) INTRODUCTORY LOGIC
An introduction to deductive and inductive techniques used in appraising arguments. The course will contain some elementary formal logic, but its main focus will be on analyzing arguments as they occur in everyday life and in ordinary language.

PHIL 313 H(3-0) ISSUES IN BIOETHICS
This course provides an introduction to ethical reasoning in health care and will seek to situate medical ethics within a broad understanding of health, medicine and health care. The primary topics will be the general principles of bioethics for health care, the ethical dilemmas associated with the beginnings of life and with death and dying, and the issues of social justice raised by Canadian health legislation. Christian and religious perspectives in health care decision-making will be included.
Prerequisite: Second-year standing

PHIL 345 H(3-0) THOMAS AQUINAS: HIS LIFE, TIMES AND THOUGHT
This course is an investigation into the life and thought of the mediaeval philosopher, Thomas Aquinas. It will examine the life of the Dominican scholar from within the historical and socio-political context of 13th century Europe. The course will conduct a thorough philosophical examination of Aquinas’ intellectual inheritance from Aristotle, in addition to his contributions to theories of knowledge, metaphysics and human nature. Finally, the course will offer a detailed philosophical investigation of Aquinas’ moral theories, ethics and their relationship to natural law and political thought.
Prerequisite: PHIL 351
Note: Credit for both PHIL 345 and HIST 319 will not be allowed.

PHIL 351 H(3-0) ETHICS
This course is an introduction to the primary philosophical questions surrounding the issues of human life and the pursuit of the good. The primary ethical theories will be explored through an examination of major historical thinkers from Greek, Mediaeval, modern and feminist perspectives. Throughout the course ethical questions will be explored at the intersections of theories of action, philosophical anthropology and metaphysics.
Prerequisite: HIST 200 or HIST 200A and HIST 200B or PHIL 200 or PHIL 201

PHIL 353 H(3-0) CONTEMPORARY ETHICAL ISSUES
This course examines contemporary ethical issues through the exploration of the central philosophical issues pertaining to debated topics. Such topics include sexual ethics, abortion, medical ethics including euthanasia and physician assisted suicide, environmental ethics, business and economic ethics, the ethical treatment of animals, issues pertaining to freedom of expression and censorship, issues surrounding the use of violence, and various human rights issues in Canada including aboriginal rights.
Prerequisite: PHIL 351

PHIL 373 H(3-0) EPISTEMOLOGY
A study of central topics in the theory of knowledge such as truth and rationality, skepticism and the limits of knowledge, relativism and the objectivity of knowledge, and the role of perception, memory and reason as sources of knowledge.
Prerequisite: PHIL 200 or PHIL 201

PHIL 391 H(3-0) EXISTENTIALISM
This course deals with several of the fundamental issues and concepts of existentialist thought, from Kierkegaard to Heidegger. Other thinkers to be considered are Nietzsche, Unamuno, Marcel, Camus and Sartre.
Prerequisite: : PHIL 200 or PHIL 201, HIST 200 or HIST 200A and HIST 200B, or permission of the instructor.

PHIL 395 H(3-0) METAPHYSICS
An historical and conceptual approach to metaphysics. The four historical periods considered are the Greek concern with form, the medieval concern with being, the modern concerns with thought and consciousness, and contemporary Anglo-American concerns with verification and continental concerns with interpretation. Conceptual issues include the problem of the priority of metaphysics or epistemology, concern with the origins of knowledge starting with the problem of epagoge and form and of the concept of being, and the origins of knowledge in the cognito. Concluding lectures will deal with the application of metaphysical properties in logic, ethics, science (including evolutionary biology and physics) and epistemology.
Prerequisite: PHIL 200 or PHIL 201

PHIL 397 H(3-0) HERMENEUTICAL THEORY
A study of the hermeneutical tradition in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, focusing on the works of Schleiermacher, Dilthey, Heidegger, Gadamer and Ricoeur.
Prerequisite: PHIL 200, or PHIL 201 or permission of instructor

PHIL 399 H(3-0) CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY
This course considers questions central to recent and current debates in the philosophy of history, from R.G. Collingwood to the present. The questions include: “What is the nature of historical explanation?”, “What does it mean to say that historians provide knowledge of the past or historical knowledge?”, “Do the works of historians give us fact or fiction or a mixture of the two?”, “What implications does historical narrative have for claims to historical truth?”, “What implications does the ‘linguistic turn’ in history, have for the work of historians?”.
Prerequisites: PHIL 200, PHIL 201, any history course, or permission of the instructor.
Note: Credit for both PHIL 399 and HIST 397 will not be allowed.

PHYS 211 H(3-2T) MECHANICS
Topics include motion in one dimension, including displacement, velocity and acceleration, relative motion, graphical analysis of motion, vectors, Newton’s laws of motion, statics with forces, uniform circular motion and other curvilinear motion, non-inertial reference frames, potential work and energy, gravitational energy, conservation of mechanical energy, friction, systems of particles and momentum conservation, and statics involving torques.
Prerequisite: Pure Mathematics 30, MATH 30-1 or MATH 105. Physics 30 is strongly recommended.

PHYS 223 H(3-1T-3L) INTRODUCTORY ELECTROMAGNETISM, FLUIDS AND THERMAL PHYSICS
Topics include hydrostatics, pressure and density, Archimedes’ principle, apparent weight, floating, hydrodynamics, ideal and real fluids, viscosity, the continuity equation, Bernoulli’s equation, thermal physics, temperature, heat and the First Law of Thermodynamics, thermal expansion, the kinetic theory of gases, ideal and real gases, PVT diagrams, electric charge and electric field, Coulomb’s Law, electric potential, potential energy, capacitance, electric current, resistance, Ohm’s Law, circuits, work, energy and EMF, magnetic fields, Hall effect, magnetic force on a current, magnetic fields due to a current, Ampere’s Law, induction and inductance, and Lentz’s Law. Laboratory work includes experimental techniques, data collection, graphical analysis, and report writing for experiments in mechanics, thermodynamics, and electromagnetism.
Prerequisite: PHYS 211

POLI 201 H(3-0) INTRODUCTION TO GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS
This course introduces students to the key concepts and vocabulary associated with politics and provides a framework for understanding and explaining formal political systems and informal political processes. Emphasis will be on the role of politics in the central dilemmas facing contemporary society: power, responsibility and justice.

POLI 213 H(3-0) POLITICAL IDEOLOGIES
This course introduces various contemporary political ideologies to political science majors and to interested students from other majors. The course introduces various approaches to the study of ideologies and examines a number of ideologies that shape the world in which we live.

POLI 283 H(3-0) ISSUES AND TRENDS IN WORLD POLITICS
This course is a non-technical introduction to world politics for majors and non-majors. It covers major trends and issues in world politics such as international tensions, migration, ethnic conflicts, human rights and sustainable development. This course is concerned more with basic trends in world politics than the discipline of world politics. The course will also focus on significant current events.

POLI 309 H(3-0) HISTORY OF POLITICAL THOUGHT I
A critical study of political and legal concepts through history that focuses on the nature and the criteria of the good regime and justice. The criteria for the good regime will be enunciated and applied to the classical (Platonic, Aristotelian, and Roman) and medieval (Augustinian and Thomistic) conceptions of the good regime.

POLI 311 H(3-0) HISTORY OF POLITICAL THOUGHT II
This course is a continuation of POLI 309. It focuses on early modern (Machiavelli, Hobbes and Locke) and late modern (Rousseau and Marx) conceptions of the good regime, including an examination of the views of various other prominent thinkers in these eras.
Prerequisite: POLI 309

POLI 321 H(3-0) CANADIAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS
This course is an introduction to the Canadian political system, with an emphasis on the formal institutions of the Canadian state as well as an analysis of the processes, groups and culture of Canadian politics.
Prerequisites: POLI 201 or permission of the instructor

POLI 353 H(3-0) PROPERTY AND JUSTICE
An ethical reflection on property and money, work and prosperity in the political context. The course focuses on Augustine, Aquinas and contemporary Christian views.

POLI 357 H(3-0) CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN CANADIAN PUBLIC POLICY
An introduction to public policy in Canada through an examination and evaluation of public policy responses to contemporary Canadian social, economic, environmental, technical, cultural and political issues. The course includes consideration of the policy-making process, those who participate, and the various assumptions and factors that influence the shape, scope and distributive dimensions of public policy.

POLI 359 H(3-0) COMPARITIVE GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS
Whoever knows only one country knows none. This course introduces students to the importance of comparative political analysis by examining the variety of political systems in the world. Particular attention will be paid to the problems confronting industrial and post-industrial societies as well as the nature of democracy and the processes of democratization in an increasingly interdependent world.

POLI 361 H(3-0) Environmental Politics and Policies
This course explores a range of environmental problems (from toxic chemicals to nuclear waste to climate change) and policies that have been created to deal with these issues. A key focus of the course is approaching the subject with a wide lens to capture the immense complexities and perspectives involved. This course will therefore explore scientific, economic, sociological, philosophical and religious views to thinking about the environment, in order to appreciate and assess the various political aspects of acting (or not acting) on it.

POLI 381 H (3-0) International Relations
This course introduces students to the discipline of International Relations (IR). The main objectives of this course are: (1) to understand the IR discipline and the central concepts and theories that have shaped it; (2) to understand the dynamics of conflict, war, peace and cooperation; (3) to examine significant patterns of change and continuity in the global political order; (4) and to debate the political and ethical objectives of foreign and global policy-making in relation to security, order, rights and justice.

POLI 391 H(3-0) GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS OF LATIN AMERICA
A general survey of contemporary Latin American government and politics. The purpose of the course is to acquaint students with social and political institutions, political processes and events in the region. It seeks to help students understand the various regional political frameworks and to gain an appreciation for different cultural perspectives. We study selected representative states in the region by way of examining issues of process and structure, among which are regional political cultures, questions of state and society, and church and state relations.
Prerequisite: A 3-credit course in political science or HIST 377
Note: The course may be taken by political science majors and non-majors.

POLI 499 H(3-0) DIRECTED READING IN A POLITICAL TOPIC
A course of directed reading, writing and research to meet the needs of individual students who wish to pursue an area of study not covered by the current course offering. The course is structured around weekly tutorial discussions of required readings and the completion of a major research paper.
Pre-requisites: 12 credits in political science, at least 6 of which must be at senior level

PSYC 201 H(3-0) Principles of Psychology
This course provides an introduction to psychological theory and research. The course provides an introduction to the history of psychology and research methods. In addition, topics with an emphasis on the experimental analysis of behaviour will be covered; including sensation and perception, intelligence, memory, and the biological basis of behaviour.

PSYC 203 H(3-0) CRITICAL ISSUES IN PSYCHOLOGY
A continuation of PSYC 201, with emphasis on social, developmental and clinical areas of psychological inquiry.
Prerequisite: PSYC 201

PSYC 305 H(3-0) HISTORY OF PSYCHOLOGICAL THOUGHT
This course covers the development of psychological thought in Western culture and the relationships between theories of human nature.
Prerequisites: PSYC 201 and PSYC 203

PSYC 312A H(3-2L) An Introduction to Experimental Design and Quantitative Methods for Psychology
An integrated approach to the methods, principles, and ethics of psychological research, and to the statistical techniques utilized for analysis of these data. The statistical focus is on descriptive statistics, with an introduction to inferential statistics, including independent and dependent t-tests.
Prerequisites: Pure Mathematics 30, Mathematics 30-1, Applied Mathematics 30, Mathematics 30-2, Math 030 or MATH 105, PSYC 201 and PSYC 203

PSYC 312B H(3-2L) Advanced Experimental Design and Quantitative Methods for Psychology
This course is a continuation of the introduction to experimental design and quantitative methods course (PSYC 312A). Students will continue to examine inferential statistics and more advanced research designs in psychological research. Topics will include oneway and repeated measures ANOVA, factorial ANOVA, post-hoc comparisons, correlation and regression, as well as chi square analyses of frequency data. Students will also gain experience with statistical software for the purposes of analyzing data. Finally, students will gain experience in APA-style, including presenting results of statistical analyses.
Prerequisites: PSYC 201, PSYC 203, and PSYC 312A

PSYC 329 H(3-0) ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT
This course examines the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development of adolescents in a variety of contexts (e.g. family, peers, school, culture). Transitory difficulties and psychosocial problems that may arrive during this period, as well as historical events and development, will be discusses.
Prerequisites: PSYC 201 and PSYC 203

PSYC 331 H(3-0) Industrial and Organisational Psychology
This course is designed to introduce students to the theories, methods, findings and applications of industrial and organisational (I-O) psychology. This course focuses both on understanding the psychological bases of work behaviour and on the organisational practices used to create a good fit between people’s characteristics and the demand of the workplace. Topics will include job analysis, personal selection, placement, training, work motivation, job satisfaction, leadership, teams, organisational culture and work-life balance.
Prerequisites: PSYC 201 and PSYC 203

PSYC 333 H(3-0) PSYCHOLOGY OF GENDER
This course examines a variety of psychological theories and research on gender. Topics include the meaning of gender and how gender relates to roles, relationships, stereotypes, mental health, sexuality, family issues, moral development, personality and workplace issues. The course format will focus on group discussions, reflective writing and small research projects.
Prerequisites: PSYC 201 and PSYC 203

PSYC 335 H(3-0) The Psychologist and the Law
This course addresses legal issues confronting mental health professionals in Alberta. Family law, dealing with the courts, court referrals and giving testimony will be important components of this course. The legal responsibilities of those in the mental health profession will be highlighted.
Prerequisites: PSYC 201 and PSYC 203

PSYC 337 H(3-0) Community Psychology
This course is and introduction to the principles and practice of community psychology. Emphasis will be placed on the application of psychological theories and social justice. The course will introduce the student to ecological systems affecting social change, needs and resource assessment, capacity building, diversity and empowerment. Students will better understand the theory and research surrounding community-based problems and how successful prevention and intervention programs are developed and implemented.
Prerequisites: PSYC 201 and PSYC 203

PSYC 341 H(3-1T) Tests and Individual Differences
This course introduces the description, purpose, evaluation, and development of psychological tests used in various kinds of assessments. Important issues in human differences will be discussed. Also, issues around the future of testing, the law, cultural diversity, test bias and the role of the internet will be introduced.
Prerequisites: PSYC 201 and PSYC 203

PSYC 345 H(3-0) PSYCHOLOGY OF EDUCATION
This course is intended to provide an overview of the psychology of education. It will facilitate a greater understanding and appreciation of the role and function of psychological principles in educational settings. Particular focus will be contributions of psychological principles in educational settings, and contributions of psychological theory and practice in the areas of human development and learning. This course will consist of lecture presentations, group projects and group presentations.Prerequisites: PSYC 201 and PSYC 203

PSYC 353 H(3-0) PSYCHOLOGY OF AGING
This course covers recent developments in the psychology of aging. The major theories, types of research and processes related to aging are examined. Topics to be covered include the physiological, cognitive and social aspects of aging.
Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and PSYC 203

PSYC 355 H(3-0) Social Psychology
This course provides an overview of the major topics and issues in social psychology, focusing on how we think about ourselves and interact with others. The course emphasizes the unique contribution of social psychologists to the theory and understanding of social behaviour in such areas as the self, social beliefs and judgements, behaviour and attitudes, attitude change, cultural and gender, conformity and obedience, persuasion, prejudice and discrimination, and aggression.
Prerequisites: PSYC 201 and PSYC 203

PSYC 357 H(3-0) Introduction to Cross-Cultural Psychology
This course provides an overview of cross-cultural research in a broad range of areas, including human development, identity, social behaviours, personality, cognition and abnormal behaviour. This course will also examine theories of acculturation and the experiences of ethnic and minority groups living in the Canadian cultural mosaic, in areas such as the family, education, the workplace, and counseling settings.
Prerequisites: PSYC 201 and PSYC 203

PSYC 359 H(3-0) Health Psychology
This course will provide a detailed examination of how personal health issues impact an individual’s psychological functioning as well as the impact of psychological issues on the health of the individual. Health care issues that impact an individual’s psychological functioning are addressed. Examples of these issues are stress, lifestyle choices, and sociocultural difference in health care.
Prerequisites: PSYC 201 and PSYC 203

PSYC 361 H(3-0) CHILD DEVELOPMENTAL
This course presents students with a broad and integrative overview of child development through the lens of psychology. Major theories and research findings will be discussed in order to understand how children develop physically, socially, emotionally, and cognitively from the periods of conception to late childhood.
Prerequisites: PSYC 201 and PSYC 203

PSYC 365 H(3-0) COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY
This course offers an investigation into research theory in cognitive psychology. Topics include the processing, storing and retrieval of information; perceptual, attentional and language processes, and problem solving. The biological bases for these processes are also investigated.
Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and PSYC 203

PSYC 369 H(3-0) SENSATION AND PERCEPTION
The physiological and psychological bases of sensation and perception are explored. Topics such as pitch perception, colour vision and perception of movement, size and distance are included. The areas of sensation and perception are integrated through a human information-processing approach to the understanding of audition, vision and other modalities.
Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and PSYC 203

PSYC 375 H(3-0) BRAIN AND BEHAVIOUR
An introduction to the anatomy, development and plasticity of the nervous system. Other topics will include the brain mechanisms involved in regulating internal body states, sensations, perception, cognition and psychological disorders.
Prerequisites: PSYC 201 and PSYC 203

PSYC 393 H(3-0) Personality
An introductory survey including representative theoretical points of view and research relevant to the study of personality, its development and manifestation in an individual’s life. Students will study how environmental and genetic factors make us both unique and similar to one another.
Prerequisites: PSYC 201 and PSYC 203

PSYC 400 F(3-0)Psychology Senior Seminar
This course is designed as a capstone course for students in their final year of study in the 120-credit Bachelor of Arts, Honours Psychology degree. Students will conduct a research project in an area of psychology, under consultation with a supervisor. Students will be required to write a formal research proposal, carry out a research project, write up a manuscript-style-paper of the research and present it to their peers. This course must be taken in the final year of study.
Prerequisites: PSYC 312A and PSYC 312B

PSYC 407 H(3-0) Communication and Counselling Skills
This course is intended for students who wish to develop basic communication and counselling skills. Students will learn a variety of skills that enhances communication in relationships and helps develop a working alliance with clients. The emphasis in this course will be on developing one’s helping skills through in-class practice and observation. The general applicability of the skills covered in this course makes them relevant to a wide variety of situations involving interaction between individuals.
Prerequisites: PSYC 201, PSYC 203, 6 senior credits in Psychology, and 3rd or 4th year standing
Note: Students are encouraged to take PSYC 407 in combination with PSYC 409.

PSYC 409 H(3-0) THEORIES OF COUNSELING
This course provides a thorough review of all of the major counseling and psychotherapy theories. A detailed discussion of strategies and approaches associated with each perspective will be presented. Students will assess the strengths and weaknesses of each theory. Practitioner commentaries and assessments will be reviewed. Multicultural perspectives will be examined and students will be encouraged and expected to address relevant cultural issues of each theory. Students will be encouraged to develop their own theoretical orientation.
Prerequisites: PSYC 201, PSYC 203 and 6 senior credits in psychology

PSYC 411 H(3.0) Advanced Studies in Clinical Psychology
This course provides an in-depth study of psychological concepts introduced in introductory psychology courses. Students will integrate clinical principles and research as they develop their own theoretical orientation. Multicultural perspectives will be examined and students will be expected to apply this knowledge in the development of their own theoretical orientation. A more in-depth study of research and clinical ethics, psychology as a regulated profession, and developing perspectives for the future will be presented.
Prerequisites: PSYC 201, PSYC 203 and 6 senior credits in psychology

PSYC 413 H(3-0) PSYCHOLOGY OF TRAUMA
This course is designed for students interested in the study of traumatic stress and the psychology of trauma. The course will provide an overview of the different types of traumatic stress; the cognitive, neurological, and clinical components of trauma; cultural components of trauma, and clinical assessment. There will be a brief review of trauma in the counselling setting.
Prerequisites: PSYC 201, PSYC 203 and PSYC 359

PSYC 441 H(3-0) Forensic Psychology
This course examines the research and application of psychological knowledge to the justice system. Areas such as the empirical and theoretical analysis of criminal behaviour and correctional psychology will be discussed. Special topics such as the use of the polygraph, false confessions and the question of whether treating adolescents as adults in the criminal justice system is appropriate or not will also be presented. There will be an emphasis on the Canadian justice system.
Prerequisites: PSYC 201, PSYC 203, and PSYC 393

PSYC 453 H(3-0) Advanced Topics in the Psychology of Aging: Cognitive Processes
This advanced seminar course takes an in-depth look at cognitive processes during aging: sensation, perception, attention, memory, intelligence. The theory and research surrounding cognitive aging will be reviewed and discussed. Students will explore sociocultural and environmental factors in relation to cognitive functioning, as well as the real-world implications of cognitive functioning. The focus will be on expected changes in normal adults, with some discussion of pathological changes.
Prerequisites: PSYC 201, PSYC 203 and PSYC 353

PSYC 463 H(3-0) Sport Psychology
This course provides the students with an understanding of the psychological and social factors inherent in sport and exercise. Topics will include understanding participants’ (e.g., personality, motivation, stress); sport and exercise environments (e.g. competition, reinforcement); group processes (e.g., team dynamics, leadership); enhancing performances (e.g., imagery, concentration); improving health and wellbeing (e.g., injuries, unhealthy behaviours, burnout and overtraining). This course will provide students with a greater understanding of the psychological dimensions of sport, exercise and health.
Prerequisites: PSYC 201, PSYC 203, and either PSYC 355 or HMKN 201/HMKN 203

PSYC 465 H(3-0) LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT
An in depth examination of language development. Topics will include phonological, lexical and syntactic development, as well as the role of culture and family on the development of language. Bilingualism and language development in special populations will also be explored.
Prerequisite: PSYC 201, PSYC 203 and PSYC 361

PSYC 475 H(3-0) HUMAN NEUROPSYCHOLOGY
This course will explore how brain damage can affect various cognitive, behavioural, and affective processes. After a brief review of neuroanatomy and physiology we will discuss a variety of diseases studied by neuropsychologists and examine the effects of brain damage in humans on specific cognitive, perceptual, affective, and motor functions. We will cover a number of different clinical conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease, amnesia, stroke, agnosia, and aphasia.
Prerequisite: PSYC 201, PSYC 203 and PSYC 375

PSYC 485 H(3-0) Psychology of Abnormal Behaviour
Students will examine abnormal behavior and how this behaviour is understood in both the historical and modern perspective. Students will be introduced to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) to assist them with the description and causes of the major psychological disorders.
Prerequisites: PSYC 201, PSYC 203, and PSYC 393

PSYC 495 H(3-0) Consumer Psychology
This course will enable students to apply psychological, social and cultural concepts to marketing decision making. Topics will include theories of attitude formation and change, memory, personality, consumer decision making, behavioural outcomes and the importance of consumer behavior and research. Throughout the course an emphasis will be placed on applying theoretical knowledge to various marketing situations.
Prerequisites: PSYC 201, PSYC 203 and PSYC 355 or MGST 321

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RLGS 201 H(3-0) WORLD RELIGIONS – WESTERN
The course begins with an introduction to the nature of religion and a survey of prominent features in Aboriginal traditions. Subsequent study focuses on the origins and development of the three monotheistic religions: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. The lectures will examine prominent sacred texts of these religions in the Hebrew Bible, the New Testament and the Qur’an, respectively. In addition, the class examines the theology, practices and observances that account for the distinctive culture each of these religions generates.

RLGS 203 H(3-0) WORLD RELIGIONS – EASTERN
This course surveys the origins and development of the major religions of the East: Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, Chinese Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism and Shinto. The lectures focus on the historical development, sacred stories, belief systems, forms of prayer and worship, community structures and ethical principles of these religions.

RLGS 205 H(3-0)Reading Biblical Texts
An introductory survey of the geographical, historical and cultural milieu of the Ancient Near East and Mediterranean world provides the backdrop for examining texts that represent the diversity of biblical literature. The survey of biblical literature includes examples from the Pentateuch, the Prophets, the Deuteronomistic History, the Wisdom Literature, the Gospels, the Pauline letters and the Johannine corpus. Treatment of the texts illustrates that sensitivity to the various literary forms is essential to biblical interpretation. The course introduces the student to the religion of ancient Israel, the emergence of early Judaism and the genesis of Christianity.
Antirequisites: THEO 201

RLGS 301 H(3-0) The Catholic Intellectual and Cultural Tradition
Catholicism is a conversation among people seeking God in community for more than 2,000 years. The course surveys the historical development of Catholicism and its embodiment in diverse cultures across the world. Students will contemplate the intellectual pursuits, architectural wonders, and artistic masterpieces that are emblematic of every era in the history of Catholicism. These intellectual and cultural achievements are expressions of diverse communities such as early assemblies of Jews and Gentiles, monasteries of monks or nuns, parishes around the world. This overview of history and culture encourages inquiry into biblical interpretation, philosophical analyses, developments in art and literature, and ethical concerns of the contemporary world.
Antirequisites: CATH 301

RLGS 305 H(3-0) Rome and Christian Spirituality
This course has special costs and required international travel. This travel study course explores the development of Christian spirituality from its origins to the present day through the lens of Rome. From ancient imperial capital to centre of the Roman Catholic Church today, Rome presents a living history like no other city. This course examines how Christians throughout history have approached God in prayer and practice, and how these diverse spiritualties have intersected with art, architectures, politics, and culture.
Note: Credit for both RLGS 305 and HIST 381 will not be allowed.

RLGS 311 H(3-0) The Torah: A Debate About God and Religion
The first five books of the Bible constitute the Torah, the core of Scripture in Jewish Tradition. This course will survey the contents of this compendium. A close reading will expose a diversity of traditions that underlay the texts and bespeak the rich oral and literary heritage of this corpus. The course will consider a variety of literary forms including epic, myth, novella, poetry, song legislation, and discourse. The course will consider the major issue of theology and humanism in the Pentateuch including the portrayals of God and of humankind respectively as well as their interaction under the rubrics of creation, elections, redemption, and covenant.
Antirequisites: THEO 311

RLGS 313 H(3-0) Jesus and the Gospels
This course focuses on the four gospels. The course begins with a discussion of, “Who was Jesus of Nazareth?” It then focuses on how each gospel portrays him. A discussion of the “Synoptic Problem” will elaborate on the literary connections between Mark, Matthew and Luke and the distinctiveness of John. The course will introduce the student to the methods of historical, form, source, and redaction criticism respectively. Moreover, the course will provide a narrative analysis of each of the gospels.
Antirequisites: THEO 301

RLGS 315 H(3-0) Paul and His Letters
A biographical sketch of Paul provides the background for interpreting the letters that scholars universally agree come from his hand. This course introduces the students to: 1 Thessalonians, Galatians, 1 and 2 Corinthians, Philippians, and Romans. Attention focuses on the humanism in Paul and cultural issues that are distinctive of each letter. The course provides a synthesis of Paul’s outlook on God, Jesus, humankind, grace, faith, community, and the dynamics of history.
Antirequisites: THEO 303

RLGS 317 H(3-0) Social Justice and the Bible
This course will examine legislation and narratives concerning social justice in the biblical word. Legal texts and the history of social reform in Mespotamia and Egypt provide background for understanding the emerging preoccupation with justice themes in the Torah, Prophets and Writings of the Hebrew Bible. This course will focus on legislation, narratives and prophetic material which relate to issues of justice and peace in our contemporary world. Two-thirds of the course will focus on material in the Hebrew Bible and one-third will concentrate on material in the New Testament within the setting of the Grego-Roman world.
Antirequisites: THEO 321

RLGS 321 H(3-0) Vatican II and Beyond
Through objective analysis, this course aims to familiarize students with the essential components of Catholic thought and tradition as expressed in the documents of Vatican II, the Catechism of the Catholic Church, and other preconciliar and post-conciliar sources. The course seeks to provide students with the skills necessary to critically review material from many sources and to situate the arguments in their historical contexts. Sources and articles critical of recent developments and those that highlight issues relevant to the modern world will be assigned. Justice issues, women’s roles, war and peace, liberation theology, feminist perspectives and conservatism are but a few of the critical issues that may be discussed. Additionally, students may choose from an unlimited range of other contemporary sources as they research and present issues.
Antirequisites: THEO 349

RLGS 323 H(3-0) Catholic Social Justice
Catholic social justice offers a vision for enhancing the lives of everyone everywhere in the world today. Catholic social thought expresses a commitment to justice through a network of principles including: the dignity of the human person, human rights, cultural development, the common good, global solidarity, preferential care for the poor, economic viability for all, democratic participation, stewardship of creation, peace and disarmament, and institutional change that benefits everyone, especially marginalized people. This course examines the historical evolution of these principles especially from the 19th century to the present. Students will experience the practical application of these principles through a required Community Service-Learning (CSL) placement.
Antirequisites: CATH 311

RLGS 331 H(3-0) Christianity and Empire, Origins to 1492
This course explores the historical engagement of various Christian traditions with the prevailing political, social and ethnic cultures in the western world and beyond. Students will also examine the development of Christianity as it confronts changes in the symbolic and intellectual universes over the first 1,500 years of Christian life and thought. The course: describes the prominent figures and theological debates that led to controversies in the early church, delves into the new challenges and opportunities that faced the imperial church, and surveys the rich diversity of Christianity in the Latin West and Byzantine East during the Middle Ages.
Antirequisites: THEO 345
Note: Credit for both RLGS 331 and HIST 311 will not be allowed.

RLGS 333 H(3-0) Christianity, Conquest and Science, 1492 to Present
This course explores the momentous events of post-Reformation Christianity as it engages with the prevailing political, social and ethnic cultures around the world. Students will also examine the development of Protestant, Catholic, and Orthodox Christianities as they confront changes in the symbolic and intellectual universes. Beginning with the Protestant Reformation of the sixteenth century, this course surveys; the missionary ventures in the 16th and 17th centuries and the establishment of colonial Christianity in the New World; the struggles between science and faith during the Enlightenment and later; and how Christianity responded to modernity in the twentieth century and postmodernity in the twenty-first.
Antirequisites: THEO 347
Note: Credit for both RLGS 333 and HIST 313 will not be allowed.

RLGS 363 H(3-0) THE JEWISH EXPERIENCE IN HISTORY
This course provides a survey of the history, theology, ritual and practise of Judaism. A survey of the biblical foundations in the Torah, prophets, and post-exilic restoration to Judah provides the foundation for a treatment of subsequent developments in Judaism up to the present era. Topics include the formation of the Torah, the Mishnah and the Talmud; traditions of prayer; history of European Jewry; tensions with the Christian Church; the Jewish Year; Hasidism; the development of anti-Semitism; responses to modernity; the emergence of Zionism, and contemporary life in a synagogue.
Note: Credit for both RLGS 363 and HIST 309 will not be allowed.

RLGS 341 H(3-0) Medieval Women Mystics
This course investigates the mystical and visionary experiences of women in the medieval period in Europe, focusing on the representation of gender in their writings and the cultural contexts of their lives. We will read texts written by women including Hildegard of Bingen, Hadewijch of Brabant, Mechthild of Magdeburg, Catherine of Siena, Julian of Norwich and Margery Kempe. We will learn the stories of their lives, explore the varieties of their spiritual practices and consider the images they employ to convey their unique visions of the divine.
Note: Credit for both RLGS 341 and HIST 317 will not be allowed.

RLGS 351 H (3-0) Religion and Science in Dialogue
This course discusses the conversation between science and religion in the 21st century. The discussion begins with a brief review of their interactions from antiquity to the medieval period. It focuses on developments in Newtonian physics, Darwinian evolutionary biology and quantum physics and cosmology in the tradition of Stephen Hawking. The course takes account of religious traditions across the world, but its primary focus is on the monotheistic traditions, particularly Judaism and Christianity.

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SCIE 201 H(3-3/2L) EVERYDAY SCIENCE: THE PHYSICAL WORLD
Have you ever wondered about the nature of the universe, how hybrid cars work, or wanted to understand the science behind ongoing debates such as climate change? In this course designed for non-science majors we will examine the basic physical and chemical principles behind these and many other science-based questions we encounter in society. In the laboratory component of the course, students will learn the methods by which science is done, core principles of the physical sciences, and the limitations of knowledge. Some laboratory sessions will recreate historic experiments in science, such as Galileo’s famous experiment on gravity. At the conclusion of this course students will be able to comprehend the basic physical and chemical principles behind many societal issues as well as understand the nature of science and its strengths and limitations.

SCIE 301 H(3-3/2L) EVERYDAY SCIENCE: THE LIVING WORLD
Have you ever questioned whether you must get the flu shot each year, the safety of genetically modified foods, or if there might be life on other planets? In this follow up course to SCIE 201 we will continue our examination of scientific issues in our lives, focusing on the biological and chemical principles behind them.Since students are assumed to have an understanding of the basic nature of science, a greater emphasis will be placed on examining the interdisciplinary nature of science. This will be evidenced in the laboratory component of the course, where laboratory exercises will focus on integrating concepts from SCIE 201 with applications in the living world, such as how the wavelength of light affects photosynthesis in plants. Students completing this course will understand the science component of societal issues, will be able to appreciate the interdisciplinary nature of science, and will be able to intelligently discuss and understand most scientific issues.
Prerequisite: SCIE 201

SCIE 399 Directed Studies in Science
A course to meet the needs of individual students who wish to pursue an area of study not covered by current course offerings. Students will meet with the professor weekly for structured tutorial discussion and produce a major project showing extensive independent exploration of subject area.
Prerequisites: at least 9 senior credits in science (e.g. BCEM, BIOL or CHEM) and permission of the instructor

SOCI 201 H(3-0) AN INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
This course presents an introduction to sociology, with a strong focus on the theories of the sociological perspective and the methods used in sociological research. Students will also learn about areas of substantive interest to sociologists, including social processes, social problems and social institutions.

SOCI 303 H(3-0) SOCIOLOGY OF GENDER AND GENDER RELATIONS
This course provides an overview of the sociological study of gender and gender relations. Students use theories of the sociological perspective to study a variety of issues, including the social construction of masculinity and femininity, gender socialization, representations of gender in the mass media and gender inequality.
Prerequisite: SOCI 201

SOCI 313 H(3-0) Introduction to Research Methodology
This course provides students with a comprehensive introduction to research methodology. Students will discuss the many issues, debates and methods that characterize research, including the philosophy of scientific inquiry and the accumulation of knowledge, qualitative and quantitative styles of research, and the strengths and weaknesses of various research methods such as experiments, surveys, observation, secondary data analysis and content analysis.
Prerequisites: SOCI 201
Antirequisites: IDST 313

SOCI 325 H(3-0) CRIME AND DEVIANCE
Analysis of deviant, criminal and delinquent behaviours, including adult and youth activities. A study of the social processes involved in defining deviant and criminal behaviour patterns, and an examination of the factors that influence conformity and change.
Prerequisite: SOCI 201

SOCI 327 H(3-0) SOCIAL STRATIFICATION
This course provides an introduction to the sociological study of structured inequality in Canadian and global contexts. Topics include theories of inequality and their application to inequalities of class, race/ethnicity, gender, age and ability.
Prerequisite: SOCI 201

SOCI 343 H(3-0) SOCIOLOGY OF MEDIA
This course offers a sociological examination of mass media as a critical aspect of society and culture, with an emphasis on the Canadian context. Students will use the sociological perspective to examine various issues and controversies including the role of the media as a social institution, its complex interplay with other social institutions and the way that media messages influence our individual and collective identities.
Prerequisite: SOCI 201

SOCI 353 H(3-0) Sociology of Education
This course offers an introduction to the sociological study of education, both as a social institution and as a context for individual experience. The primary emphasis will be on education in Canadian society. Students will use the theories of the sociological perspective to analyze a variety of topics including the development of education as a social institution in Canada, critical issues in Indigenous education, educational structures, barriers, policies, and practices, and educational experiences from pre-school to postsecondary and beyond.
Prerequisite: SOCI 201

SOCI 371 H(3-0) SOCIOLOGY OF FAMILIES
This course provides an overview of the sociological study of families with an emphasis on the Canadian context. Students consider theoretical debates surrounding a number of issues of interest to family sociologists, including definitions of “families” and events of the family life cycle.
Prerequisite: SOCI 201

SOCI 375 H(3-0) Race and Ethnic Relations
This course provides a conceptual framework for the study of race and ethnic relations. Within this general context we examine a variety of topics including assimilation, pluralism, multiculturalism and specific intergroup relations. Our discussions are not restricted to Canadian society, but include countries such as the United States, Israel, Germany, Northern Ireland, South Africa, Brazil and others.
Prerequisites: SOCI 201

SOCI 377 H(3-0) SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION
An introduction to the theories and concepts used by sociologists to interpret religious behaviour and the organization of religion. We will approach the dilemmas of religion by focusing on religious experience, myths, rituals, ethics and social organization. The course will also consider the interface between religion and family, economy and the post-modern world. Integrated into the subject matter will be the discussion of secularization as a central concept and process.
Prerequisite: SOCI 201

SOCI 393 H(3-0) SOCIOLOGY OF SPORT
This course offers a sociological overview of some of the issues and controversies involving sport in society, with an emphasis on the Canadian context. Issues examined will include the complex interrelationships between sport and social institutions (such as government and politics, the economy and big business, the mass media, the education system and the family) as well as how sport influences our individual and collective identities.
Prerequisite: SOCI 201

SPAN 201 H(4-1T) BEGINNERS’ SPANISH I
This is a beginner course in grammar and composition for students who have no knowledge of the language. An oral approach is stressed through the use of dialogues, structural patterns and conversation. The study of grammar will be contextualized in culture through a variety of authentic lectures.
Note: Not open to students who have completed Spanish 30

SPAN 203 H(4-1T) BEGINNERS’ SPANISH II
This is an intensive course in grammar and composition, with further development of oral skills. The study of grammar will be contextualized in culture through a variety of authentic lectures.
Prerequisites: Spanish 30, SPAN 201 or permission of the instructor

SPAN 301 H(4-1T) INTERMEDIATE SPANISH
Comprehensive development of listening, speaking and writing skills, with an emphasis on reading about the cultures of the Hispanic world.
Prerequisites: SPAN 203 or permission of the instructor

SPAN 303 H(4-1T) INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II
This course explores a variety of topics related to Latin American, Spanish and North American Hispanic cultures to enhance and further develop language skills and cultural appreciation of the Spanish- speaking world.
Prerequisite: SPAN 301

STAT 213 H(3-2L) INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS I
Topics include collection and presentation of data; introduction to probability, including Bayes’s rule; expectations and distributions; properties of the normal curve; the sampling distribution of the sample mean, and introduction to estimation and hypothesis testing.
Prerequisite: Pure Mathematics 30, MATH 30-1, MATH 030 or MATH 105

STAT 217 H(3-2L) INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS II
Topics include estimation of population parameters, confidence intervals for the difference of two means, tests of hypotheses including 2-sample tests and paired data comparison, analysis of variance (ANOVA), goodness-of-fit and independence tests, variance estimates and tests, and non-parametric methods, time series and forecasting.
Prerequisite: STAT 213

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THEO 339 H(3-0) AUGUSTINE OF HIPPO: HIS LIFE, TIMES AND THOUGHT
This course offers an introduction to the life and thought of Augustine of Hippo through the study of his autobiography, the Confessions. Our focus will be a close reading of the text. However, our reading will be informed by a consideration of the historical context of Augustine’s life and work, the major theological themes of his writings, and Augustine’s far-reaching legacy in the history of Christian thought and practice.
Prerequisite:RLGS 205, THEO 201
Note: Credit for both THEO 339 and HIST 315 will not be allowed.

THEO 343 H(3-0) WOMEN IN EARLY CHRISTIANITY
This course investigates the role and representation of women in early Christianity from the period of Jesus’ ministry to the fifth century AD. The course study includes specific historical women, attitudes toward women, and constructions of female gender as they relate to ideas and behaviours in early Christianity. The emphasis of this course rests on primary sources and their interpretation, using feminist, historical, socio-cultural, theological and literary methods to explore the ways in which women are represented in canonical and non-canonical sources.
Note: Credit for both THEO 343 and HIST 303 will not be allowed.

THEO 503 H(3-0) UNDERSTANDING THE SACRAMENTS
Historical development and current understandings of sacramental rites, the role of the sacraments in Christian life and as community celebrations, and the role of the school in the teaching of sacraments.
Note: Restricted to students enrolled in one of the Catholic Educator programs

THEO 505 H(3-0) SPIRITUAL TRADITIONS IN CHRISTIANITY
An overview of Christian spirituality and the universal call to holiness. Attention will be given to understanding Christian spirituality as it relates to contemporary Christian living and the quest for the integration of mind, body and soul. The study will be rooted in scripture and Christian tradition. The course will cultivate an awareness of the variety of Christian spiritualities.
Note: Restricted to students enrolled in one of the Catholic Educator programs

THEO 521 H(3-0) SCRIPTURAL THEMES
The formation of the Old and New Testament texts, literary forms, critical analysis, the major themes of the Old and New Testament, and the life, death and resurrection of Jesus. A pedagogical perspective is included.
Note: Restricted to students enrolled in one of the Catholic Educator programs

THEO 541 H(3-0) THEOLOGY OF THE CHURCH
A survey of the self-understanding of the Church as articulated in the documents of Vatican II and in subsequent statements of the Magisterium and studies by theologians. An examination of biblical images of the Church provides a foundation for discussing issues such as authority and structure, community, ministry, mission to the world at large, ecumenism and interfaith dialogue.
Note: Restricted to students enrolled in one of the Catholic Educator programs

THEO 543 H(3-0) THEOLOGY OF CHRIST
An overview of the manner in which tradition and contemporary theologians interpret the person of Christ in relationship to the world, the Church, and the individual. The course begins with research into the person and mission of Jesus of Nazareth as well as the diverse portraits of Christ in the New Testament literature. Students examine the Christological formulations of major councils of the Church. Particular attention is paid to the developments in understanding Christ in the wake of Vatican II.
Note: Restricted to students enrolled in one of the Catholic Educator programs

THEO 551 H(3-0) SOCIAL ISSUES IN THE THEOLOGICAL TRADITION
A survey of Christian social thought. The course traces the development of social thought in the Christian tradition from the biblical era to the present day. Students will become familiar with basic concepts such as the common good, natural law and social justice. They will examine, in particular, the social teaching of the Church from Leo XIII to Vatican II and beyond that to the present.
Note: Restricted to students enrolled in one of the Catholic Educator programs

THEO 561 H(3-0) CONTEMPORARY ISSUES
An investigation of topics central to Christian education from fields such as ecclesiology, Christology, moral theology and ethics. Credit for this course is available to students who fulfill the course requirements during either the SPICE or Blueprints conference, which is sponsored by the Alberta Catholic School Trustees’ Association.
Note: Restricted to students enrolled in one of the Catholic Educator programs

THEO 599 H(0-3T) SUPERVISED THEMATIC STUDY
Under a professor’s guidance, the student will research and write a major presentation on a topic within the scope of the GDRE curriculum. The student will follow a program of directed reading. The written work will include an examination of the theological implications of a specific issue in religious education. This course affords the student an opportunity to produce a work that represents the culmination of the GDRE program.
Prerequisites: EDPA 591, 593, 595, THEO 503, 505, 541, 543, and 551 or consent of the Dean
Note: Restricted to students enrolled in one of the Catholic Educator programs